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Do It Yourself - - Features - WORDS LACEY HOWARD PHO­TO­GRAPHS JIM FRANCO FIELD ED­I­TOR JOE MAER

Blog­ger Kristin Jack­son gives her home a to­tal DIY re­fresh to fit the needs of her grow­ing fam­ily.

You might not rec­og­nize blog­ger Kristin Jack­son’s home. Four years of savvy DIY projects and a game-changer kitchen re­model have given her 1,000-square-foot

At­lanta home a whole new vibe.

When Do It Your­self fea­tured Kristin’s At­lanta-area home in the Spring 2014 is­sue, the 1,000-square­foot res­i­dence was home to Kristin, hus­band Rob, and their daugh­ter Chloe, then 2. To­day, the twobed­room home has three bed­rooms (with­out adding any square footage), and the fam­ily num­bers four (with the ad­di­tion of Rob’s teenage son, Todd).

Es­chew­ing the for­mal din­ing room to cre­ate a third bed­room is just one of the savvy de­sign changes Kristin, who blogs at Hunted In­te­rior, has made in the past four years. The kitchen has un­der­gone a ma­jor re­model. With­out moving walls or the sink, a new lay­out of­fers more than triple the counter space. And a cor­ner ban­quette (built by Kristin and Rob) is the fam­ily’s new din­ing area. Out­side, a DIY per­gola and out­door car­pet­ing turn the once wide-open deck into an al­fresco room.

“Even though our home is over 50 years old, it was lack­ing char­ac­ter,” Kristin says. “Eleven years of DIY projects have added some his­tory and charm that go with any style.” And it’s a good thing her more-per­ma­nent ad­di­tions are style-neu­tral. No doubt, Kristin’s in­te­ri­ors—and fam­ily—will con­tinue to evolve.

IN A SMALL HOUSE WITH A YOUNG FAM­ILY, THINGS CAN CHANGE QUICKLY. WHEN THE HOME BE­LONGS TO IN­TE­RIOR DE­SIGNER KRISTIN JACK­SON, THEY CAN ALSO CHANGE DRA­MAT­I­CALLY.

THEN Kristin Jack­son’s liv­ing room, op­po­site in­set, has never suf­fered from a lack of cre­ativ­ity: hand-painted chevrons on IKEA drap­ery pan­els and an up­hol­stered ot­toman crafted from a curb-side cof­fee ta­ble find. NOW Kristin up­dated the room’s look with paint—black ceil­ings and white walls—and mold­ing that she cut and in­stalled her­self, above. Mir­rors flank a sin­gle win­dow on one end of the room to ex­pand the vis­ual space. Above the win­dow, Kristin in­stalled acrylic cur­tain rods that she at­tached with brass ballet bar cen­ter mounts. “I had a hard time find­ing cur­tain rings that would fit around the rods,” she says. ”I ended up us­ing cheapo clear plas­tic shower cur­tain rings from Tar­get. But way up there you’d never know, and they look su­per ex­pen­sive!” She also carved out a nook in the liv­ing room for her home of­fice, op­po­site bot­tom.

White walls pave the way for plenty of col­or­ful ac­ces­sories in Kristin’s liv­ing room, such as the navy and mid­tone blues in the fur­ni­ture, ac­ces­sories, and art­work, and the shades of pink in the rug and chair. Metal­lic, mir­ror, and glass ac­cents make the tiny room seem larger.

THEN A sin­gle run of cab­i­nets of­fered only 42 inches of counter space, in­ter­rupted by the kitchen sink, left. “There was also a gi­ant floor-to-ceil­ing pantry—where the open shelves are now, be­low left— that ate up a lot of space,” Kristin says. Af­ter nine years in the home, the Jack­sons em­barked on a kitchen re­model.

NOW “With­out adding square footage—sim­ply by re­ar­rang­ing— we were able to nearly quadru­ple our counter space,” Kristin says. And be­cause they gave up their din­ing room, Kristin and Rob built ban­quette seat­ing into one cor­ner of the kitchen, be­low right, leav­ing the bot­tom open to avoid rerout­ing HVAC ducts and vents. “In the long run, that was best be­cause it would have kick marks all over it. The ban­quette is com­mand cen­tral,” she says.

THEN An open deck of­fered ad­di­tional din­ing space at the back of the house, in­set be­low. Kristin out­fit­ted it with a sten­ciled rug and a ta­ble for six. NOW “We cov­ered our deck in artificial turf af­ter be­com­ing frus­trated with re­fin­ish­ing the older wood year af­ter year,” Kristin says. She and Rob also built a 13×23-foot per­gola for shade, be­low, and a round ta­ble—a shape that eases traf­fic flow while still host­ing six chairs. “I found a sim­i­lar ta­ble for about six times the price,” she says. “Then found a plan on­line and built it.”

FREESTYLE

KRISTIN PAINTED THE HALL­WAY A FREE-FORM PAT­TERN US­ING LEFT­OVER PAINT. “IT WAS DONE

ON A WHIM,” SHE SAYS. “I JUST PAINTED RAN­DOM BRUSHSTROK­ES

ON THE WALL.”

NOW With­out stor­age in the bath, Kristin uti­lized an an­tique quilt rack in the hall for tow­els, op­po­site. The bath’s gor­geous tile is what sold Kristin and Rob on the house in 2006. “Back then, we didn’t know we were ca­pa­ble of DIY­ING any­thing. Af­ter see­ing a lot of re­ally bad homes while house-hunt­ing, I said, ‘Fi­nally! A bath­room I can live with!’” THEN Chloe’s nurs­ery, above right, was girly pink and de­signed for a 2-year-old. NOW The nurs­ery mor­phed from pink to black (lit­er­ally) as 15-year-old Todd’s room, above. The door­less closet be­came a dresser and desk space for Todd. “The drap­ery pan­els were an easy DIY with white drapes, black gros­grain rib­bon, and fusible hem tape,” Kristin says. “The ex­ag­ger­ated grid feels mod­ern and mas­cu­line.”

THEN Kristin and Rob added mold­ing in al­most ev­ery room of their home, in­clud­ing the mas­ter bed­room, be­low in­set. NOW Kristin calls the fawn-in­spired wall­cov­er­ing in the mas­ter, be­low, un­ex­pected. “The neu­tral tones mixed with the graphic pat­tern add a mod­ern touch,” she says. Kristin built the night­stand to fit the tight space, right. “There was a desk I wanted so badly, but it was a foot too big.” Never dis­cour­aged, she took mat­ters—and a jig­saw—into her own hands. “I free­hand drew half the pat­tern, then flipped it and copied the pat­tern for a mir­ror im­age,” she says. Now, the piece and the mir­ror above also serve as her van­ity when the home’s one-and-only bath­room is oc­cu­pied.

THEN The din­ing room, be­low in­set, had plenty of stor­age with the door-fram­ing built-ins.

NOW When Todd moved in, the din­ing room be­came Chloe’s room, left. “She loves color and pat­tern,” Kristin says, not­ing that Chloe’s opin­ion counted when it came to color choices. “Paint­ing the built-ins green was a bold choice I prob­a­bly would not have taken on my own.” Elim­i­nat­ing a cou­ple of shelves in the built-ins cre­ated space for rods to put Chloe’s hang­ing clothes on dis­play. “It helps keep me or­ga­nized be­cause when there is no closet, you can’t just shove things in the closet,” Kristin says. To block the French doors, Kristin joined three IKEA dressers and painted on a dot­ted pat­tern to match Chloe’s sheets. On the op­po­site wall, be­low right, bi­fold doors (dressed up with mold­ing by Kristin) hide the washer and dryer. “With Chloe’s move to this room, my sched­ule changed dras­ti­cally—no laun­dry af­ter bed­time,” she says.

MAKE A SPLASHOFF-THE-RACK PORCE­LAIN TILES FROM A HOME IM­PROVE­MENTCEN­TER CRE­ATETHE HER­RING­BONE BACK­SPLASH. DARK GROUT MAKES THE PAT­TERNSTAND OUT.

KRISTIN CRE­ATED A BOU­TIQUE FEEL FOR TODD’S ROOM SINCE THE CLOSET SERVES AS STUDY SPACE. A GAR­MENT RACK GIVES AN IN­DUS­TRIAL LOOK, LIKE THAT OF AHIP CLOTH­ING STORE.

“CHOOSE BED­DING SEP­A­RATELY TO MIX AND MATCH PAT­TERNS AND CRE­ATE MORE IN­TER­EST THAN A BED-IN-A-BAG. NEVER BUY THE SET.” KRISTIN JACK­SON, HOME­OWNER & DE­SIGNER

FOR RE­SOURCES SEE PAGE 108. “PINKS ARE HARD TO GET RIGHT. THIS ONE ISN’T TOO SWEET OR TOO FLESHY. I MATCHED IT TO A PAIR OF BALLET TIGHTS.”KRISTIN JACK­SON, HOME­OWNER & DE­SIGNER

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