The BUZZ

DREAM TEEN Magazine - - The Buzz -

by Jor­dan & Joelle Hern­danez A Dou­ble Dose DREAM TEEN Mag­a­zine

obbi Kristina Brown “Krissy” (March 4, 1993 – July 26, 2015) was an Amer­i­can re­al­ity tele­vi­sion and media per­son­al­ity, singer, and ac­tress. Bobbi was born on March 4, 1993, in Liv­ingston, New Jersey, to the singer Whit­ney Hous­ton and Bobby Brown. Brown’s fam­ily in­cludes ma­ter­nal grand­mother Cissy Hous­ton of The Drinkard Singers. Her mother’s cousins are Dee Dee War­wick; Dionne War­wick, mother of Damon El­liott; and Leon­tyne Price. Her un­cle is Gary Gar­land, her mother’s half-brother. Through her fa­ther, Brown had five half-sib­lings: Lan­don, La’Prin­cia, Robert “Bobby” Jr., Cas­sius, and Bodhi. Her god­mother is gospel singer CeCe Wi­nans. She was brought into the spotlight at age 1 in 1994, when her mother, the late Whit­ney Hous­ton ac­cepted an Amer­i­can Mu­sic Award while hold­ing her on stage, and Brown’s child­hood re­mained public be­cause of her par­ents’ fame. Their fame kept Bobbi Kristina in the public eye, in­clud­ing her ap­pear­ances on the re­al­ity show “Be­ing Bobby Brown.” She was known for her per­for­mances Per­for­mances and re­leases Year Song Al­bum 1999 “My Love Is Your Love” N/A Whit­ney Hous­ton at con­cert in Poland 1999 “My Love Is Your Love” N/A Live duet with Whit­ney Hous­ton fea­tur­ing Treach at the Di­vas Live ‘99 con­cert: 2003 “Lit­tle Drum­mer Boy” One Wish: The Hol­i­day Al­bum Fea­tured singer with Whit­ney Hous­ton 2009 “My Love Is Your Love” N/A Live duet with Whit­ney Hous­ton at the Good Morn­ing Amer­ica Con­cert in Cen­tral Park on Septem­ber 1, 2009 2012 “I’m Your Baby Tonight” The Hous­tons: On Our Own Tele­vi­sion: Year Ti­tle 2005 Be­ing Bobby Brown 2009 The Oprah Win­frey Show 2012 2012 2012 2012 tion­ist

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Notes

Her­self

Tina the re­cep-

2.Take five min­utes to plan your day be­fore you head out the door in the morn­ing. Mark down on a cal­en­dar ap­point­ments or meet­ings you have or might need to con­firm, dead­lines for up­com­ing projects, and other to-dos. These small steps can help you not only man­age your time more ef­fi­ciently, but keep you on point when it comes to fin­ish­ing tasks.

6.Let go of some­thing in five min­utes. Is there some­thing you need to get rid of in your life phys­i­cally, like some­thing you no longer wear or use; or emo­tion­ally such as im­pa­tience, worry or fear? Take five min­utes to go through your closet or drawer and de­clut­ter it. If an item is in good con­di­tion, do­nate it to an or­ga­ni­za­tion or give to a friend. If it’s neg­a­tive emo­tions that are tak­ing up space in your mind, close your eyes and vi­su­al­ize your­self re­leas­ing them. Rec­og­nize how use­less and coun­ter­pro­duc­tive these emo­tions are to you be­ing the best . you.

*Rawsrvnt is slated to re­lease his new al­bum “Game Changer” on Oc­to­ber 9th. He will be col­lab­o­rat­ing with artists such as “Mr. One Way” him­self, Trans­par­ent, Erica Cumbo, Mil­liyon, and a host of oth­ers. Rawsrvnt was fea­tured on Don­ald Trump’s Celebrity Ap­pren­tice TV show some years ago. His mu­sic has also been li­censed to CBS and other net­works. For more in­for­ma­tion on this great artist, feel free to visit www.rawsrvnt.com

His­tor­i­cally black col­leges and/or univer­si­ties (HBCUs) are ex­tremely im­por­tant in the African Amer­i­can com­mu­nity. When these univer­si­ties were formed, they were built with the pur­pose of serv­ing and ed­u­cat­ing blacks. They gave mil­lions of blacks the op­por­tu­nity for a higher ed­u­ca­tion. Ac­cord­ing to hb­cus­ports.com, Spel­man Univer­sity had a 79% grad­u­a­tion rate for black stu­dents in 2013. HBCUs are ac­cred­ited for the birth of celebri­ties such as Stokely Carmichael, Toni Mor­ri­son, and OprahWin­frey. How­ever, HBCUs are not only a chance to ed­u­cate one­self but they are a cul­ture, a lifestyle, and a legacy.

Stu­dents are spend­ing hours cram­ming for the SAT and ACT; par­ents are spend­ing big bucks for prep cour­ses; stu­dents and par­ents are bit­ing their nails, pray­ing that the stu­dent nails the test. How­ever, higher learn­ing in­sti­tu­tions are chang­ing their minds and are do­ing away with stan­dard­ized ex­ams in fa­vor of a strong GPA.

Yes, it is true! More and more col­leges and univer­si­ties are mak­ing sub­mit­ting SAT / ACT scores, op­tional. In­sti­tu­tions are go­ing af­ter the “well-rounded stu­dent,” not just the ex­pert test taker. Ad­mis­sions of­fices have fi­nally dis­cov­ered or, let’s just say are now will­ing to voice, that test scores do not nec­es­sar­ily pre­dict the ed­u­ca­tional suc­cess of a stu­dent. High school class­room per­for­mance is a more ac­cu­rate pre­dic­tor of col­lege suc­cess. This is great news for stu­dents who strug­gle with stan­dard­ized tests! Ad­di­tion­ally, re­search sug­gests that SAT / ACT tests tend to fa­vor stu­dents who at­tend af­flu­ent high schools, live in bet­ter neigh­bor­hoods and come from fam­i­lies that have the re­sources needed to sup­port test­ing prepa­ra­tion course ex­penses, there­fore, mak­ing the process and as­so­ci­ated tools less likely for dis­ad­van­taged, low-in­come stu­dents.

Col­leges with test-op­tion poli­cies are on the rise. More than 800 col­leges and univer­si­ties across the coun­try no longer man­date score sub­mis­sions from SAT or ACT col­lege ad­mis­sions ex­ams, ac­cord­ing to the latest sur­vey by the Na­tional Cen­ter for Fair & Open Test­ing. The list of col­leges and univer­si­ties with test-op­tions poli­cies can be found by vis­it­ing www.fairtest. org

If you plan to ap­ply to test-op­tional col­leges, un­der­stand that your GPA will have a ma­jor im­pact on the col­lege ac­cep­tance process. Col­lege Ad­mis­sions Coun­selors share that high school grades in col­lege prep cour­ses are the most im­por­tant fac­tor weigh­ing in to the ad­mis­sions de­ci­sion. Col­leges want to see that high school stu­dents are prop­erly pre­par­ing for col­lege by tak­ing cour­ses that mat­ter and get­ting grades that mat­ter even more! DT

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