Fancy re­mained un­der ob­ser­va­tion for four days, with con­tin­ued sup­port­ive med­i­ca­tions and in­tra­venous flu­ids.

EQUUS - - Eq Casereport -

Fancy re­mained un­der ob­ser­va­tion at BVEH for four days, with con­tin­ued sup­port­ive med­i­ca­tions and in­tra­venous flu­ids. Grad­u­ally, the swelling re­ceded un­til she could once again breathe through both of her nos­trils as well as eat and drink.

“Dr. Judd told me that nor­mally horses need to be on fluid for four or five days af­ter a bite,” says Ezell. “But she bounced back in three. This may have been be­cause of the an­tivenin we gave her. I think peo­ple need to con­sider that when de­cid­ing if it’s worth giv­ing an­tivenin. It’s an ex­tra ex­pense, but what you save in days of fluid ther­apy could make it worth­while.”

Once the swelling was down, Fancy’s eye could be ex­am­ined. “We saw a small ab­scess on her cornea,” says Janicek. “It could have been from a nick of a fang or it could have been from her rub­bing her eye im­me­di­ately af­ter the bite.” What­ever the cause, the treat­ment was

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