SUC­CESS IN PPID MAN­AGE­MENT

EQUUS - - Eq Medicalfro­nt -

A ret­ro­spec­tive study from Aus­tralia con­firms that horses with pi­tu­itary pars in­ter­me­dia dys­func­tion (PPID, Cush­ing’s) are likely to live longer if treated with the drug per­golide and man­aged to main­tain good body con­di­tion.

In a joint project con­ducted by eight in­sti­tu­tions in­clud­ing the uni­ver­si­ties of Queens­land, Ade­laide and Mel­bourne and Mur­doch Uni­ver­sity, re­searchers an­a­lyzed the med­i­cal records of 274 horses and ponies from across the con­ti­nent. The goal of the re­search was to de­ter­mine how clin­i­cal fea­tures of PPID dif­fered by geo­graphic lo­ca­tions and to iden­tify fac­tors associated with sur­vival.

Where the in­for­ma­tion was avail­able, re­searchers ex­am­ined ra­dio­graphs to de­ter­mine if the horses had lamini­tis and re­viewed lab­o­ra­tory re­ports from tests for in­sulin re­sis­tance. Nearly 90 per­cent of the horses tested across all lo­ca­tions had some de­gree of lamini­tis, and 76.5 per­cent had ev­i­dence of in­sulin dys­reg­u­la­tion. In ad­di­tion, the re­searchers found that, not sur­pris­ingly, horses with PPID in lower lat­i­tudes with hot­ter cli­mates were more likely to have an­hidro­sis and poly­dip­sia (in­creased thirst).

In re­view­ing the case his­to­ries of an­i­mals that sur­vived for mul­ti­ple years, the re­searchers iden­ti­fied cer­tain com­mon traits. Ponies were more likely to sur­vive, as were an­i­mals with a healthy body con­di­tion and those who were main­tained on the drug per­golide.

The re­searchers con­clude that “ad­e­quate body con­di­tion and ad­min­is­tra­tion of per­golide are fun­da­men­tal in PPID man­age­ment.” They also call for fur­ther study of horses with PPID and in­sulin dys­reg­u­la­tion.— François-René Bertin, DVM, MS, PhD

Ref­er­ence: “Fac­tors associated with sur­vival, lamini­tis and in­sulin dys­reg­u­la­tion in horses di­ag­nosed with equine pi­tu­itary pars in­ter­me­dia dys­func­tion,” Equine Vet­eri­nary Jour­nal, Novem­ber 2018

In a study of pi­tu­itary pars in­ter­me­dia dys­func­tion prog­noses, ponies were more likely to sur­vive longer as were horses with healthy body con­di­tion scores who re­ceived per­golide.

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