Farm & Ranch Living

A Dog’s Life

This worry-prone Weimaraner found a sense of purpose on the family farm.

- SARAH FEDORKE, RAVENSWOOD, WEST VIRGINIA

A worry-prone Weimaraner found a sense of purpose on this family’s farm.

Five years ago I was approached by a local animal shelter to see if I’d be interested in fostering a dog. Bullet had a lot of anxiety, and they had not been able to find him a home. I agreed, and three days later I was signing adoption papers.

Bullet won my heart from the beginning. I learned he had a sweet tooth and could be very sneaky. He stole baked goods off the counter and got into all sorts of things he shouldn’t. It became clear that I would have to keep him close, which meant he would need to learn the ropes of the farm.

The first time Bullet saw a cow, he stopped in his tracks and stared as if thinking, Wow... you’re a big dog. He had no idea what it was. The cow was equally curious—and cautious. It didn’t take Bullet long to figure out that a momma cow with a calf was not interested in playing tag with the new dog. But after some time, the animals developed a mutual respect. And while Bullet still loves to play with the calves, he has learned to do it when their moms aren’t looking.

Bullet’s confidence has really grown. We call him “the president” because he walks around the farm as if he runs the place. He loves checking cows with me on the side-byside—when we find them, he hops out and greets them one by one. He relishes every opportunit­y to drive cattle, and during hay season he jumps up in the truck with me and rides around with his head out the window, his big ears flopping in the wind. Bullet has become quite the farm dog. He’s a resourcefu­l partner and my best friend.

 ??  ?? Cheerful Bullet is ever ready to go for a ride or help round up stray cows.
Cheerful Bullet is ever ready to go for a ride or help round up stray cows.

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