Man­ag­ing Up— and Side­ways

Fast Company - - Special Report -

PEER RE­VIEW

Nearly two-thirds say they en­joy man­ag­ing peo­ple their own age, but face the fol­low­ing chal­lenges work­ing with mil­len­ni­als:

27% SAY THEY CON­STRUC­TIVE FEED­BACK PER­SON­ALLY

21% SAY MAN­AG­ING THEM FEELS LIKE MAN­AG­ING A FRIEND

19% SAY THEY RE­QUIRE TOO MUCH AT­TEN­TION OR FEED­BACK

11% SAY THEY ARE CON­STANTLY CON­NECTED

WE’VE GOT THIS

Twenty per­cent pre­fer man­ag­ing Gen Xers over other col­leagues, and 6% fa­vor baby boomer¯. ere’¯ how they deal with their elders:

35% SAY THE RE­LATE TO OLDER EM­PLOY­EES AS EQUALS

38% SAY THEY WANT TO LEARN FROM OLDER WORK­ERS

18% SAY THEY MAKE IT CLEAR THAT THEY'RE THE BOSS

“Mil­len­ni­als tend to want fast re­sults and progress in their ca­reer. [Mov­ing up] some­times re­quires more time and/or pa­tience than they are will­ing to ac­cept.” —Jes­sica, man­ager, mid­size startup

“THE DEF­I­NI­TION OF MAN­AGE­MENT HAS CHANGED. I’M NOT GIV­ING ORDERS OR CHECK­ING TIME CARDS; I’M CRE­AT­ING AN EN­VI­RON­MENT WHERE PEO­PLE CAN DO THEIR BEST WORK AND BE HAPPY. I’M THE GOOD GUY, NOT THE ‘BOSS.’” —Ray, co­founder and CEO, startup

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.