Halcyon Daze

AD­VANCED AR­MA­MENT COR­PO­RA­TION’S HALCYON: TWO RIM­FIRE SILENCERS IN ONE

Firepower - - CONTENTS - TEXT & PHO­TOS BY MIKE SEARSON

Ad­vanced Ar­ma­ment Cor­po­ra­tion’s Halcyon: Two rim­fire silencers in one

Whether you call them silencers, sup­pres­sors, muf­flers or cans, we have al­ways found the rim­fire ver­sions to be the most use­ful and prac­ti­cal. The lat­est one from AAC (Ad­vanced Ar­ma­ment Cor­po­ra­tion), the Halcyon, is one of the best of the breed.

A mod­u­lar si­lencer, it has a re­mov­able front end that al­lows the user to run it long or short. This is pat­terned af­ter the com­pany’s mod­u­lar pistol silencers in its Ti-rant M se­ries.

When sup­press­ing 17 HMR, 17 M2, 22 Mag- num or even FN’S 5.7, you may want to run a longer pro­file si­lencer for bet­ter sup­pres- sion, and in this case that is a mat­ter of 5.28 inches with a weight of 6 ounces. How­ever, if you want to quiet down a bolt-ac­tion 22 long ri­fle and keep a shorter pro­file you can

take it down to a 3.4-inch can that weighs a scant 4.5 ounces. Switch­ing back and forth takes just sec­onds with­out tools just like the com­pany’s Ti-rant 45M and Ti-rant 9M.

When our good friends at Si­lencer­shop.com asked us if we wanted to try it, we leaped at the chance and we had one ready to go in less than a week.

There is some good news on that front, courtesy of Si­lencer­shop.com. Owing to the staff’s back­ground in IT (In­for­ma­tion Tech­nol­ogy), they re­cently teamed up with sev­eral in­dus­try part­ners and the NFA Branch to de­velop a bar-coded sys­tem for ATF Forms. It re­duces some of the wait­ing pe­riod, par­tic­u­larly on the Form 3 (dealer to dealer) side as the forms need only be scanned. This saves 15 to 30 min­utes on the part of an ATF Ex­am­iner who would need to type this in­for­ma­tion man­u­ally. Mul­ti­ply that by the thou­sands of forms be­ing pro­cessed and it adds up. Form 3 ap­provals have been re­duced from 4-6 weeks down to 24 hours and some­times less be­cause of the bar code. We re­cently had one come back in less than an hour.

Un­for­tu­nately, Form 4 trans­fers are still tak­ing close to a year for ap­proval. This is a haz­ard of the NFA (Na­tional Firearms Act) and is mostly re­lated to the im­ple­men­ta­tion of 41P last July. How­ever, we have seen more of the holdup on the side of the back­ground checks tak­ing longer than nor­mal from the FBI/NICS desk.

With the wait times in­volved with NFA and the $200 tax stamp, we like to take ad­van­tage of mod­u­lar cans, which give you in essence two silencers for one price. Not that you can make two stand­alone cans from one of th­ese, but it gives you an op­tion.

Con­struc­tion

Tak­ing the Halcyon apart, we noted that the baf­fles were K-type and made of ti­ta­nium.

This keeps the weight down and re­duces sound sig­na­ture. Then we no­ticed that they were keyed for re­peat­able short align­ment in an ef­fort to not re­duce but elim­i­nate Point of Im­pact (POI) shift. The front sec­tion of the tube is made of alu­minum and the rear por­tion is ti­ta­nium with steel end caps. The whole unit is fin­ished in ar­mor-black Cer­akote.

AAC prom­ises ad­di­tional adapters in other thread pitches to re­place the stan­dard ½ x

28” threaded end cap. Hope­fully we will see ½ x 20” to use on Eu­ro­pean rim­fire ri­fles and the threaded Beretta Model 71 pis­tols that were im­ported a few years ago by Cen­tury In­ter­na­tional Arms. Un­doubt­edly we will see end caps from AAC for use on var­i­ous other rim­fire hand­guns that have a two-piece bar­rel con­struc­tion and can skip buy­ing ques­tion­able adapters. We have heard a three-lug adapter is in the works, too.

An­other unique fea­ture that we have not seen else­where is a wave spring lo­cated un­der the rear end cap that ap­plies ten­sion to the thread adapter and aligns it to the main tube in or­der to pre­vent the rear cap from loos­en­ing while fir­ing.

What re­ally im­pressed us is the fact that the en­tire si­lencer can be taken down and re­assem­bled, as well as re­con­fig­ured from long to short ver­sions, with­out the use of tools. The baf­fles dump out of the tube eas­ily and be­cause they are ti­ta­nium they can be cleaned more eas­ily than stain­less steel or alu­minum baf­fles. You can use Hoppe’s #9 on th­ese or clean them in an ul­tra­sonic cleaner with no wor­ries at all about de­grad­ing the ma­te­rial.

Per­for­mance

We took the Halcyon to the range with an as­sort­ment of rim­fire ri­fles and hand­guns as well as our FN PS90 SBR (Short Bar­reled Ri­fle) and our full-auto Uzi with a 22 con­ver­sion kit, as the Halcyon is full auto-rated.

One of the de­sign fea­tures that AAC set out to ad­dress specif­i­cally with the Halcyon was the elim­i­na­tion of first round pop (FRP). First Round Pop refers to the ini­tial air trapped in­side the sup­pres­sor. When this oxy­gen burns up af­ter mak­ing con­tact with the hot gasses from the fired round it makes the first shot sound louder as a re­sult of be­ing fu­eled from the cooler air. Sub­se­quent shots tend to be qui­eter. It is a prob­lem with just about any type of sound sup­pres­sor but it does seem am­pli­fied in sup­pressed 22 rim­fire cans. This is due to how in­her­ently quiet most of th­ese silencers are. The AAC Halcyon has min­i­mal­ized this to such a de­gree that it is barely no­tice­able.

We mounted the short con­fig­u­ra­tion on sev­eral ri­fles, in­clud­ing a Sav­age 93 and a S&W M&P 15/22. It was so quiet on the Sav­age that some­one asked me if I was shoot­ing a

pel­let gun. The 16-inch bar­rel al­lows enough time and space for all of the pow­der to burn up be­fore the bul­let en­ters the si­lencer, and with no semi-au­to­matic bolt or any­thing else to al­low gas and noise to es­cape you can count on the full 43 db re­duc­tion promised by AAC.

That said, the S&W M&P 15/22 was only slightly louder. Plus, the look it gave this ri­fle made it ap­pear to only have a slightly longer flash sup­pres­sor as op­posed to a full-on sound sup­pres­sor. On the FN P90 (ac­tu­ally a PS-90 con­verted to an SBR) the longer ver­sion sounded bet­ter than the short mode. The short ver­sion may not have been com­pletely hear­ing-safe, but it gave us no tin­ni­tus from shoot­ing it. Mov­ing over to hand­guns, we found the longer ver­sion to work bet­ter with re­gard to sound re­duc­tion than the short­ened one. This goes back to bar­rel length and burn­ing time of the pow­der from the fired round.

The long ver­sion mounted on a Smith & Wes­son model 41 was prob­a­bly our qui­etest pistol host of the day. The Ruger Mk IV and Walther PPK/S in 22 LR worked well in each con­fig­u­ra­tion, but our ba­sic take­away on the Halcyon is to run it short on ri­fles with 16-inch-plus bar­rels and long on any­thing shorter, in­clud­ing pis­tols.

Fi­nal thoughts

An all-ti­ta­nium rim­fire sup­pres­sor would have been awe­some, but would have un­doubt­edly driven up the price. As it is, an MSRP of $450

pushes it to­ward the higher end of the scale for 22 cans.

We were go­ing to lay off on buy­ing silencers un­til the Hear­ing Pro­tec­tion Act passed. How­ever, in light of the cur­rent po­lit­i­cal land­scape, we think we will see a Zam­boni smooth­ing over the 9th cir­cle of hell be­fore that hap­pens.

As the backlog from 41P is clear­ing at the NFA Branch and forms are start­ing to move more quickly through the sys­tem, along with con­sumer in­cen­tives in the form of lower prices and re­bates, this is prob­a­bly the best time in his­tory to pur­chase a si­lencer.

The word Halcyon refers to a myth­i­cal bird, usu­ally iden­ti­fied with the king­fisher, said to breed about the time of the win­ter sol­stice in a nest float­ing on the sea, and has the power of charm­ing winds and waves into calm­ness. Al­ter­na­tively, it can de­note a pe­riod of time in the past that was idyl­li­cally happy and peace­ful. In the spirit of ei­ther of those def­i­ni­tions, we think the Ad­vanced Ar­ma­ment Cor­po­ra­tion Halcyon is one of the best rim­fire sup­pres­sors we have ever shot. It can make any day at the range, or a sim­ple walk in the woods while out squir­rel hunt­ing, calm, happy and peace­ful. Par­tic­u­larly with re­gard to the quiet time it gives.

We like to take ad­van­tage of mod­u­lar cans, which give you in essence two silencers for one price.

The front sec­tion of the tube is made of alu­minum and the rear por­tion is ti­ta­nium with steel end caps. The whole unit is fin­ished in ar­mor-black Cer­akote.

As the backlog from 41P is clear­ing at the NFA Branch and forms are start­ing to move more quickly through the sys­tem, this is prob­a­bly the best time in his­tory to pur­chase a si­lencer. A wave spring lo­cated un­der the rear end cap ap­plies ten­sion to the...

The Halcyon's baf­fles are K-type and made of ti­ta­nium, keep­ing the weight down and re­duc­ing sound sig­na­ture.

Full size is 5.28 inches with a weight of 6 ounces, but if you want to keep a shorter pro­file you can take it down to a 3.4-inch can that weighs a scant 4.5 ounces.

Our ba­sic take­away with the Halcyon is to run it short on ri­fles with 16-inch-plus bar­rels and long on any­thing shorter, in­clud­ing pis­tols.

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