LESS IS MORE

Flea Market Décor - - Contents - By Kathryn Drury Wag­ner

See how this folk artist’s re­stricted pal­ette and in­ge­nu­ity trans­form the or­di­nary into the ex­tra­or­di­nary.

COUNT ON ME

Top left: A vin­tage aba­cus like this one, cost­ing be­tween $10 and $25 at a flea mar­ket, makes a great dec­o­ra­tion for a child’s room be­cause it also en­cour­ages math skills. While we of­ten as­so­ciate aba­cuses with China, they were also com­monly used in Euro­pean coun­tries such as Rus­sia, Den­mark and Poland by school­child­ren. Top right: Anna cor­rals her art sup­plies into vin­tage jars so that she can see what’s avail­able.

SNEAKY STORAGE

Bot­tom left: Us­ing a hinged box as part of a dis­play gives spe­cial ob­jects a vis­ual boost off the floor—and pro­vides another valu­able spot for stor­ing more items. If you are re­pur­pos­ing an old trunk, suit­case or box, first vac­uum it out with a hose at­tach­ment. Then fill it with kitty litter for a few days and seal it. Empty it out, and it should be all fresh and ready to use. ROCK ON

Fun fact: Ac­cord­ing to the Strong Mu­seum of Play in Rochester, New York, rock­ing horses first be­came en vogue in the 16th cen­tury. The first ones looked like cra­dles, so that tod­dlers could rock them­selves. By the 18th cen­tury, horses’ legs got longer, at­tached to the now-fa­mil­iar bow shape.

“It is one of the old­est houses in THE RE­GION,” SAYS ERIK, WHO BE­LIEVES THE COT­TAGE WAS BUILT IN THE LATE 18TH CEN­TURY.

The fan has a place of honor on the new plank floor of her room. “IT DOESN’T WORK, BUT IT IS BEAUTIFUL,” she says.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.