Home Is Where the Heart Is

Part­ners Jeff and Jef­fery use small vi­gnettes to dress their Wis­con­sin home with hol­i­day cheer.

Flea Market Décor - - Ad Index - BY JESSIE YOUNT PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICK WILKES STYLING BY JEFF CUN­NING­HAM AND JEF­FERY FREDENDALL

For more on Jeff and Jef­fery, visit them on In­sta­gram @twocav­a­lier­gentle­men.

WHEN IT COMES TO FIND­ING FLEA-MAR­KET DÉ­COR,

part­ners and home­own­ers

Jeff Cun­ning­ham and Jef­fery Fredendall look for the un­com­mon. “It’s all about what catches our eye. If some­thing looks in­ter­est­ing or unique, we’ll buy it and ac­ces­sorize around it,” says Jeff.

Jef­fery agrees, “Even dur­ing the hol­i­day sea­son, we like to use a lot of the ev­ery­day. We tend to leave ev­ery­thing out and add to it.” Rather than re­dec­o­rat­ing the whole house, the home­own­ers pre­fer to mix the old with the new. And the pair aims to bring about cheer and glee through the use of vi­gnettes or group­ings, sprin­kling pieces with sto­ries and mean­ing through­out their home.

Jeff and Jef­fery make it look like a breeze, but when it comes to styling vi­gnettes, cre­at­ing vis­ual depth is key. It goes be­yond vary­ing the height and size of items, although that is a great first step.

“It’s about scale,” Jef­fery ex­plains. “We tend to buy

smaller items be­cause we have a lot of win­dows, and we don’t have room for big­ger pieces. In­stead we in­cor­po­rate lit­tle items.” For ex­am­ple, the pair dec­o­rated a small tin­sel tree with even smaller red bas­kets, rib­bons and beads to add lay­ers of vis­ual in­ter­est.

Con­sider the im­pres­sion you want to make too. The duo’s cozy abode ben­e­fits when items are grouped to­gether asym­met­ri­cally, cre­at­ing a sense of ca­sual ease. On the other hand, if you pre­fer a mod­ern de­sign scheme, es­tab­lish or­der and sym­me­try by as­sem­bling ob­jects in a straight line, and don’t place them too close to one an­other.

“We don’t shy away from mix­ing dif­fer­ent col­ors, pat­terns and tex­tures,” Jef­fery says. “We use more burlap and a lot of plaid dur­ing the hol­i­day sea­son.” Burlap and plaid add a homey qual­ity, and they soften the wood, metal and glass ma­te­ri­als around the house.

While the mix of ma­te­ri­als cre­ates a pleas­ing aes­thetic, color is just as im­por­tant. “Lucky for us, we’re drawn to the color red, so it’s re­ally about adding green,” Jef­fery says. In­deed, hints of green—a wreath and a few trees—are scat­tered through­out. Us­ing fresh, liv­ing plants will in­fuse the house with a win­try scent too.

Jef­fery adds, “We live in up­per Wis­con­sin, where the cli­mate is cold and dark, so the more color the bet­ter, es­pe­cially for the hol­i­days.”

op­po­site: US­ING GREEN­ERY—PINE

and holly, among other kinds—is an es­sen­tial part of hol­i­day dec­o­rat­ing. The wreath with light-blue berries acts as the fo­cal point of this vi­gnette, bring­ing fresh­ness to the scene.

WHEN THE PRESENTS ARE WRAPPED

and placed be­neath the tree, the home­own­ers ac­ces­sorize smaller spa­ces with left­over rib­bon. Jeff says, “We have an ex­ten­sive col­lec­tion of rib­bon, and it’s a great way to add plaid to the home.”

left: SELTZER BOT­TLES with brass tops pair well with the ban­quet lamp be­hind them, which Jeff un­earthed from his great un­cle’s at­tic. The bronze shades com­ple­ment one an­other, and when the lamp is turned on, it sets the bot­tles aglow.op­po­site: BRASS BELLS and old keys dan­gle from metal hooks, rings and twine against an old cab­i­net. The cab­i­net it­self be­longed to a for­mer trav­el­ing sales­man be­fore the pair picked it up. Mean­while, bright red berries pop out of an old-fash­ioned Lucky Strike tin, adding a burst of color to the oth­er­wise neu­tral tones.

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