Forbes

“We are un­apolo­get­i­cally Black

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on the is­sues of sys­temic racism in cor­po­rate Amer­ica and the lack of Black rep­re­sen­ta­tion in C-suites, as CEOs, and in board rooms… But let me be clear: I see this in­flec­tion point in our his­tory not as Black vs. White. It’s Black vs. racism, which means it’s got to be ev­ery­one vs. racism… Ev­ery­one has to be an ally.”

The Ex­ec­u­tive Lead­er­ship Coun­cil (the ELC) has seized the op­por­tu­nity pre­sented by what seemed at first to be unimag­in­able events be­gin­ning ear­lier this year. First the coronaviru­s pan­demic, con­tin­u­ing to roll across the united states and the globe, laid bare the gap­ing in­equities in health care ser­vices and health out­comes that have stressed Black Amer­i­cans for cen­turies. then videos of the death of Ge­orge Floyd at the hands of a po­lice of­fi­cer co­a­lesced in the minds of many Amer­i­cans the long his­tory of un­jus­ti­fied vi­o­lence by law en­force­ment, ig­nit­ing protests in cities and towns across the coun­try. the protests con­tinue, es­ca­lated by more vi­o­lence against pro­test­ers, lo­cal, state and fed­eral mil­i­tary-like re­sponses to them, and then the provo­ca­tion of white armed “mili­tia.” this is not the Amer­ica we want. We can­not con­tinue to ig­nore the con­tra­dic­tion be­tween the founders’ writ­ten ideals and the fact of slav­ery and its legacy. rec­on­cil­i­a­tion is the only path to­ward the more per­fect union our Con­sti­tu­tion an­tic­i­pated. “We are un­apolo­get­i­cally Black on the is­sues of sys­temic racism in cor­po­rate Amer­ica and the lack of Black rep­re­sen­ta­tion in C-suites, as Ceos, and in board­rooms,” de­clares Crys­tal E. Ashby, interim pres­i­dent and Ceo of the eLC as of Jan­uary 1, 2020, and the first woman to hold that ti­tle. “We know the changes that must oc­cur, and we em­brace us­ing our voice and power to ef­fect that change,” she con­tin­ues. “But let me be clear: I see this in­flec­tion point in our his­tory not as Black vs. White. it is Black vs. racism, which means it’s got to be ev­ery­one vs. racism. if Black peo­ple could have solved this prob­lem on our own, we would have done so al­ready. no one gets to stand on the side­lines any­more. ev­ery­one has to be an ally. the fu­ture has to be dif­fer­ent from this mo­ment.” in fact, ma­jor cor­po­ra­tions were among the first to speak out against cen­turies of dis­parate treat­ment and present govern­men­tal over­reach, rec­og­niz­ing that pay­ing lip ser­vice to in­equities is no longer ac­cept­able. speak­ing di­rectly to cor­po­rate Amer­ica, Ceo Ashby asks: “Hav­ing al­lies is crit­i­cal to ef­fect­ing real change. What po­lit­i­cal cap­i­tal are you will­ing to spend to en­sure that to­mor­row is bet­ter than to­day?”

The ELC is part­ner­ing with cor­po­ra­tions as they nav­i­gate an end to the deep in­equities spot­lighted by the twin pan­demics of Covid-19 and racism.

Af­ter decades of re­search, phi­lan­thropy, and lead­er­ship de­vel­op­ment, the ELC plays a cen­tral role as a change agent, with its time-tested, unique ser­vices to mem­bers, cor­po­rate Amer­ica, en­trepreneur­s, and the broader Black com­mu­nity in the us and the world. the ELC is part­ner­ing with cor­po­ra­tions as they nav­i­gate an end to the deep in­equities spot­lighted by the twin pan­demics of Covid-19 and racism to: (1) in­crease the rep­re­sen­ta­tion of Black ex­ec­u­tives in the C-suite, in the Ceo of­fice, and in the board­rooms of the top 500 com­pa­nies, and (2) build an ever-in­creas­ing pipe­line of Black Amer­i­cans at all lev­els of op­er­a­tion who are ready to step into those roles for gen­er­a­tions to come. Black ex­cel­lence, ig­nored for decades – re­ally cen­turies – must be a part of the new re­al­ity.

the ELC’s 2020 June­teenth Call to Ac­tion

im­me­di­ately fol­low­ing the protests against the mur­der of ge­orge Floyd, CEO Ashby seized the ELC’S mi­cro­phone, call­ing on the Ceos of ELC mem­ber cor­po­ra­tions to join the ELC’S June­teenth Con­ven­ing. “if Black lives don’t mat­ter, no lives mat­ter,” Ceo Ashby de­clared. “si­lence and in­ac­tion are un­ac­cept­able.” Barely three weeks later, the ELC con­vened – vir­tu­ally – nearly 240 ELC mem­bers and cur­rent and for­mer Ceos of mem­ber com­pa­nies, “June­teenth was our stake in the ground,” she says. “You can’t deny the racism pan­demic any­more. You have to act on it.” ELC mem­ber me­mories of per­sonal dis­crim­i­na­tory ex­pe­ri­ences set the tone. ELC board Chair tonie Leather­berry opened the meet­ing with re­flec­tions on the defin­ing mo­ments of racism in her own life. “the trauma is real,” she stated. “We are at the tip­ping point in our busi­nesses and within our­selves. the emer­gence of Covid-19 has am­pli­fied health dis­par­i­ties and ed­u­ca­tional in­equities that now force us, as lead­ers, to look at things dif­fer­ently. We must em­ploy eco­nomic, busi­ness, and com­mu­nity per­spec­tives to face these chal­lenges to­gether, and these are all eco­nomic and busi­ness chal­lenges.” Ceo Ashby mod­er­ated the hour-long ses­sion, where all five speak­ers – Marvin El­li­son, Ceo of Lowe’s; Clarence Otis, Jr., Lead di­rec­tor, ver­i­zon, and for­mer Ceo of dar­den restau­rants; Carol tomé, Ceo, UPS; David G. Clu­nie, ex­ec­u­tive di­rec­tor of the Black eco­nomic Al­liance (BEA); and Dr. robert W. Liv­ingston, Pub­lic Pol­icy Lec­turer at Har­vard’s Kennedy school of gov­ern­ment – called on par­tic­i­pants to face the root causes of racism in Amer­ica, still re­ver­ber­at­ing to­day, and to be­gin the jour­ney to en­dur­ing change, both in­side and out­side their cor­po­ra­tions. CEO Ashby first as­serted the ob­vi­ous: “there is no risk at­tached to in­vest­ing in Black tal­ent.” she then asked each Ceo to “own the path for­ward… be in­ten­tional and trans­par­ent… and stay the course.” she added, “in­vest in HBCus [His­tor­i­cally Black Col­leges and uni­ver­si­ties] and in­vest in and cul­ti­vate Black busi­nesses to be­gin clos­ing the racial wealth gap.” A copy of the eLC re­port ELC June­teenth CEO Con­ven­ing – CEOs Com­bat Sys­temic Racism: A Frame­work for Suc­cess was dis­trib­uted. it pro­vides a road map for achiev­ing a trans­formed cor­po­rate cul­ture through im­me­di­ate Ceo steps, longer-term strate­gies for sys­temic change, score­cards to mea­sure progress, and rad­i­cal steps to ad­vance racial jus­tice. “to para­phrase famed ar­chi­tect Buck­min­ster Fuller,” con­cluded CEO Ashby, “we are build­ing a new model that makes the old model ob­so­lete. We are here to help, and to­gether we can cre­ate a dif­fer­ent fu­ture that de­liv­ers value to so­ci­ety and to our share­hold­ers.”

the Dis­ap­point­ing sta­tus Quo: Facts about black In­clu­sion at the top

the ELC’S fo­cus, to see cor­po­rate Black ex­cel­lence re­warded, is com­pelling, for Black Amer­i­cans as well as for all Amer­i­can busi­ness. But progress has been slow, of­ten ag­o­niz­ingly slow. since the death of ge­orge Floyd, sev­eral com­pa­nies have al­ready stepped up to in­crease their Black board rep­re­sen­ta­tion, some by fill­ing va­can­cies and oth­ers by in­creas­ing the size of their boards. And a num­ber of com­pa­nies and in­di­vid­u­als have reached out to the ELC for its deep pool of qual­i­fied can­di­dates.

the find­ing from Miss­ing Pieces: The 2018 Board Di­ver­sity Cen­sus of Women and Mi­nori­ties on For­tune 500 Boards, pub­lished Jan­uary 2019 by the Al­liance for Board di­ver­sity (ABd) (a col­lab­o­ra­tion among the eLC, Cat­a­lyst, HACr (His­panic As­so­ci­a­tion on Cor­po­rate re­spon­si­bil­ity), and LeAP (Lead­er­ship ed­u­ca­tion for Asian Pacifics)), and di­ver­si­fied search and deloitte that women and mi­nori­ties will rep­re­sent 40% of those boards by 2024 is cer­tainly wel­come, but it glosses over the fact that Black rep­re­sen­ta­tion, when dis­ag­gre­gated, is far below a crit­i­cal mass and is not trend­ing up. Black men and women to­gether held only 486 (8.6%) of 5,670 board seats at For­tune 500 and equiv­a­lent com­pa­nies, 332 by Black men (5.9%) and 154 (2.7%) by Black women. other re­cent sur­veys do not im­prove these sta­tis­tics. Black Ceos of For­tune 500 or equiv­a­lent com­pa­nies, as of septem­ber 2020, still to­tal less than 1%, none of them women. A July 2020 USA TO­DAY re­view of proxy state­ments from the top 50 Stan­dard & Poor’s 100 found only five Black ex­ec­u­tives among the 279 named most se­nior ex­ec­u­tives, just un­der 2%, and that fig­ure in­cludes two Black ex­ec­u­tives who have since re­tired. What holds back Black board Ceo and C-suite rep­re­sen­ta­tion? “Black cor­po­rate lead­ers are in your or­ga­ni­za­tions now, de­spite what i of­ten hear,” an­swers CEO Ashby. A 2019 study jointly con­ducted by the eLC and Korn Ferry, The Black P&L Leader Re­port, proved that cur­rent Black P&L lead­ers not only ex­ist but that they share all the skills, ex­pe­ri­ences and com­pe­ten­cies, driv­ers and traits of their white coun­ter­parts. “they sim­ply lack op­por­tu­ni­ties for ad­vance­ment,” ex­plains CEO Ashby. “they’re over­whelm­ingly not seen, not val­ued as highly as their peers, not po­si­tioned for suc­cess.”

“Black men and women to­gether held only 486 (8.6%) of 5,670 board seats at For­tune 500 and equiv­a­lent com­pa­nies…”

Alexis de toc­queville, a French diplo­mat and his­to­rian fas­ci­nated by the Amer­i­can ex­per­i­ment from its be­gin­ning, ob­served af­ter a visit in 1830, “the sur­face of Amer­i­can so­ci­ety is cov­ered with a thin layer of demo­cratic paint.” He was think­ing of the aris­toc­racy near the sur­face, but he could as eas­ily have been think­ing of slav­ery. Will Amer­ica fi­nally strip away the badges of slav­ery that to this day fence Blacks from the in­clu­sion they have more than earned? What fol­lows are the steps the eLC has made to take ad­van­tage of to­day’s his­toric op­por­tu­nity.

the board Di­ver­sity Ac­tion Al­liance and the board Chal­lenge

in early septem­ber 2020, the eLC an­nounced the for­ma­tion of two new part­ner­ships to jump-start change. the eLC part­nered with the board Di­ver­sity Ac­tion Al­liance, led by Ur­sula burns, for­mer Xerox Ceo, Gabrielle sulzberger, Chair­man of true Food Kitchen in­vestco

“Our ob­jec­tive this year was to in­spire and mo­ti­vate CEOs to em­brace dis­rup­tive strate­gies that yield bold, trans­for­ma­tional and mea­sur­able ac­tions… We want to erad­i­cate sys­temic racism.”

LLC and gen­eral Part­ner at rus­tic Canyon, and its found­ing part­ners, the Ford Foun­da­tion and global CEO ad­vi­sory firm teneo. it is a fo­cused and aligned ef­fort to in­crease the rep­re­sen­ta­tion of racially and eth­ni­cally di­verse di­rec­tors on cor­po­rate boards, be­gin­ning with Black di­rec­tors. sig­na­to­ries com­mit to:

• In­crease the num­ber of black di­rec­tors to one or more;

• Dis­close the self-iden­ti­fied race and eth­nic­ity of board di­rec­tors; and

• re­port on di­ver­sity, eq­uity and in­clu­sion mea­sures on an an­nual ba­sis.

The eLC is also a Char­ter Pledge Part­ner in the board Chal­lenge, a move­ment to “chal­lenge” com­pa­nies to ap­point a Black di­rec­tor within the next year. the ini­tia­tive was founded by Al­time­ter Cap­i­tal, va­lence, and theBoard­list, and has al­ready been signed by 43 Found­ing and Char­ter Pledge Part­ners. the strat­egy for meet­ing the Chal­lenge is to con­vince cor­po­ra­tions to go be­yond re­quir­ing di­rec­tor can­di­dates to have prior board ser­vice and draw from a wider pool of can­di­dates ready with the broad skills board mem­bers seek for their com­pa­nies.

2020 GameChange­r Con­fer­ence©

the theme of the sec­ond GameChange­r Con­fer­ence©, a vir­tual gath­er­ing of eLC mem­bers and their Ceos the day of the vir­tual 2020 An­nual eLC gala, was not mod­est: “Driv­ing a Sys­temic Break­through: The Erad­i­ca­tion of Racism in Busi­ness.” this off-the-record peer-to-peer ex­pe­ri­ence al­lowed Ceos, C-suite ex­ec­u­tives and thought lead­ers to share data-driven in­sights and best prac­tices. “our ob­jec­tive this year was to in­spire and mo­ti­vate Ceos to em­brace dis­rup­tive strate­gies that yield bold, trans­for­ma­tional and mea­sur­able ac­tions,” re­ports CEO Ashby. “We are look­ing for tan­gi­ble re­sults. We want to erad­i­cate sys­temic racism.” Fea­tured speak­ers were brian Cor­nell, board chair & Ceo, tar­get; David tay­lor, chair, pres­i­dent & Ceo, P&g; Doug McMil­lon, pres­i­dent & Ceo, Wal­mart inc., chair, the Busi­ness round­table;

tim ryan, se­nior part­ner & chair, PwC us; Cindy Kent, eLC mem­ber, pres­i­dent & evP, se­nior Liv­ing, Brook­dale se­nior Liv­ing; Clarence Otis, Jr., eLC mem­ber, lead di­rec­tor, ver­i­zon; hu­bert Joly, pro­fes­sor, Har­vard Busi­ness school, for­mer ex­ec­u­tive chair, Best Buy; Ed­die Glaude, Jr., Ph.d, pro­fes­sor & chair, African-Amer­i­can stud­ies, Prince­ton univer­sity; Michael hyter, eLC mem­ber, Cdo, Korn Ferry; Lanaya Irvin, pres­i­dent, Co­qual; Julia tay­lor Kennedy, evP, Co­qual; and Ed Dan­dridge, eLC board mem­ber, svP, Boe­ing. Four com­pa­nies, self-ap­pointed “early adopters” – At&t, JPMor­ganChase, P&G, and tar­get – re­ported on progress they had made over the last year re­view­ing their own Black lead­ers as well as their in­ter­nal as­sess­ment, de­vel­op­ment, pro­mo­tion, and suc­ces­sion prac­tices and pro­ce­dures to find and elim­i­nate bar­ri­ers. “their pur­pose was to put in place our road map to sus­tain­able change in rec­og­niz­ing and pro­mot­ing Black ex­ec­u­tives within their own or­ga­ni­za­tions,”

ex­plains eLC vice Pres­i­dent teresa Payne-Nunn, “and there have been im­por­tant suc­cesses.” For­mer eLC board mem­ber Michael hyter, a man­ag­ing part­ner and chief di­ver­sity of­fi­cer at global con­sult­ing firm Korn Ferry and a con­sul­tant to Ceos on in­clu­sion for decades, senses real change: “this time feels dif­fer­ent. i see a gen­uine in­ter­est from se­nior lead­ers to ad­dress root causes and, most im­por­tantly, to ad­dress them in mea­sur­able ways.”

Dra­matic In­crease in the reach of the ELC Cor­po­rate board Ini­tia­tive

For many years, the eLC’s Cor­po­rate Board ini­tia­tive (CBi), in con­junc­tion with hei­drick and strug­gles and Ey, has been pre­par­ing se­lect eLC mem­bers for board di­rec­tor­ships. through a pro­gram on board gover­nance in part­ner­ship with the Na­tional As­so­ci­a­tion of Cor­po­rate Di­rec­tors (nACd), four co­horts of mem­bers stud­ied the ba­sics and com­plex­i­ties in­volved. they are in­tro­duced to

de­ci­sion-mak­ers at net­work­ing events, and re­ceive one-on-one coach­ing with eLC mem­bers who are al­ready di­rec­tors. the eLC gives names of ready can­di­dates to search firms and oth­ers when they reach out to the eLC for re­fer­rals. Board di­rec­tor­ship is not a great stretch for eLC mem­bers, ex­plains CBi chair Paula Chol­monde­ley, Ceo of the sor­rel group, “be­cause our mem­bers are al­ready func­tional heads; they are the ones that are mak­ing pre­sen­ta­tions to their boards now.” the eLC’s goal is for them “to have the back­ground, to un­der­stand how boards func­tion, to be the strong­est ex­ec­u­tives they can be when there are board op­por­tu­ni­ties.” sta­tis­ti­cal progress, how­ever, has stayed dis­ap­point­ing, caused by what Chol­monde­ley la­bels “be­nign ne­glect” or “sub­con­scious avoid­ance.” since the death of ge­orge Floyd, how­ever, the eLC has seen an in­crease in re­quests for board re­fer­rals, Chol­monde­ley re­ports, “from pri­vate and pub­lic com­pa­nies, mu­tual funds, pri­vate eq­uity firms, banks, across the whole spec­trum. this can be­come an on­go­ing process, so when ex­pand­ing the board, re­plac­ing a di­rec­tor, or tak­ing a com­pany pub­lic, they can look to the eLC.” to keep up, the eLC es­tab­lished its own in-depth data­base of mem­bers’ ex­pe­ri­ence and spe­cific skill sets and a two-step process to se­lect mem­bers to re­fer. First the data­base is scanned to cre­ate a pool of pos­si­bil­i­ties, and then the Board re­fer­ral sub­com­mit­tee, a ro­tat­ing group of eLC mem­bers who al­ready sit as di­rec­tors, makes the fi­nal rec­om­men­da­tion. in ad­di­tion, data­base com­pa­nies that search firms rely on in re­spond­ing to their clients are ap­proach­ing the eLC to part­ner with them. “it’s a ben­e­fit to these or­ga­ni­za­tions,” says Chol­monde­ley, “be­cause they in­crease the num­ber of African Amer­i­cans in their data­bases, and it’s a ben­e­fit to our mem­bers, if they choose to be listed, be­cause they get ex­po­sure to many more op­por­tu­ni­ties. the eLC is ma­tur­ing and deep­en­ing both the vis­i­bil­ity it of­fers its mem­bers and its pro­file as the re­pos­i­tory for in­for­ma­tion on Black busi­ness ex­ec­u­tives.”

In­ter­na­tional Pres­ence

Just five years ago The ELC em­barked on a cam­paign to “in­crease our rel­e­vance not just in the us but across the world,” re­calls Ar­lene Isaacs-Lowe, co-chair of the eLC’s in­ter­na­tional Pres­ence Com­mit­tee (iPC) and global Head of Cor­po­rate so­cial re­spon­si­bil­ity at moody’s, who

”Since the death of Ge­orge Floyd, The ELC has seen an in­crease in re­quests for board re­fer­rals, from… across the whole spec­trum.“

spent years liv­ing in Lon­don but is now back at head­quar­ters in new York. “We rec­og­nized that African and Caribbean Blacks in the uK face many of the same chal­lenges we face here,” agrees board Chair Leather­berry, “and broad­en­ing our com­mu­nity be­yond our bor­ders in­creases the ben­e­fit for all of us.” “the iPC also of­fers an in­stant net­work for eLC mem­bers who are ex­pats on as­sign­ment in the uK,” says Libi sprow rice, eLC vP and Chief mar­ket­ing and Com­mu­ni­ca­tions of­fi­cer, who helped launch iPC. “Con­nect­ing with other Black and African di­as­pora se­nior ex­ec­u­tives can help them nav­i­gate the uK cor­po­rate en­vi­ron­ment.” now there are close to 20 Black Bri­tish eLC mem­bers. the iPC co-chair based in Lon­don, An­drew Pearce, an Ac­cen­ture man­ag­ing di­rec­tor, re­ports, “We are now vis­i­ble role mod­els here, in­spir­ing fu­ture Black lead­ers.” rather than start­ing pro­grams in the uK, “we part­ner with uK or­ga­ni­za­tions aligned with eLC key strate­gic ob­jec­tives,” ex­plains isaacs-Lowe. the eLC spon­sors the black bri­tish busi­ness Award (BBBA) to rec­og­nize suc­cess­ful cor­po­rate ex­ec­u­tives and en­trepreneur­s, and mem­bers serve on the se­lec­tion panel. “We part­ner with the Power List,” adds Pearce, “which pub­lishes a list of the top 100 high-po­ten­tial Black tal­ent, which al­ways in­cludes uK eLC mem­bers.” the BBBA’s tal­ent Ac­cel­er­a­tor Pro­gram, also spon­sored by the eLC, has cre­ated the same sort of learn­ing ex­pe­ri­ences the eLC has in the us. A cor­po­rate board ini­tia­tive sim­i­lar to the eLC’s “pro­vides ex­pe­ri­ences for se­nior black pro­fes­sion­als to net­work with uK cor­po­rate ex­ec­u­tives and board mem­bers,” isaacs-Lowe re­lates. Pearce con­tin­ues, “in­side track, an­other pro­gram we launched, hosts small meet­ings with prom­i­nent me­dia and po­lit­i­cal fig­ures to dis­cuss the chal­lenges of race and how the eLC can help.” us and uK eLC mem­bers had im­me­di­ate re­sources to of­fer when Covid-19 and racial protests swept the us and the

“We part­ner with UK or­ga­ni­za­tions aligned with ELC key strate­gic ob­jec­tives…”

 ??  ?? Crys­tAL E. Ashby The Ex­ec­u­tive Lead­er­ship Coun­cil Interim Pres­i­dent and CEO
Crys­tAL E. Ashby The Ex­ec­u­tive Lead­er­ship Coun­cil Interim Pres­i­dent and CEO
 ??  ?? Tar­get CEO brian Cor­nell (r.) makes a point to P&G CEO David s. tay­lor dur­ing the 2019 CEO GameChange­r Con­fer­ence.
Tar­get CEO brian Cor­nell (r.) makes a point to P&G CEO David s. tay­lor dur­ing the 2019 CEO GameChange­r Con­fer­ence.
 ??  ?? ELC Board Chair Tonie Leather­berry ad­dresses ELC mem­bers at the 2020 Win­ter Meet­ing in Florida.
ELC Board Chair Tonie Leather­berry ad­dresses ELC mem­bers at the 2020 Win­ter Meet­ing in Florida.
 ??  ?? the ELC board of Di­rec­tors. tonie Leather­berry, board chair, front row cen­ter; Crys­tal E. Ashby, interim pres­i­dent and CEO, sec­ond row cen­ter.
the ELC board of Di­rec­tors. tonie Leather­berry, board chair, front row cen­ter; Crys­tal E. Ashby, interim pres­i­dent and CEO, sec­ond row cen­ter.
 ??  ?? Lowe’s CEO Marvin El­li­son was a fea­tured speaker at the 2019 ELC GameChange­r Con­fer­ence in D.C.
Lowe’s CEO Marvin El­li­son was a fea­tured speaker at the 2019 ELC GameChange­r Con­fer­ence in D.C.
 ??  ?? Riviera Beach, Florida, Mayor Ron­nie Felder (l) and West Palm Beach Mayor Keith James join ELC Interim Pres­i­dent and CEO Crys­tal E. Ashby (2nd from left) and ELC Board Chair Tonie Leather­berry to wel­come ELC mem­bers to the 2020 Win­ter Meet­ing in Florida.
Riviera Beach, Florida, Mayor Ron­nie Felder (l) and West Palm Beach Mayor Keith James join ELC Interim Pres­i­dent and CEO Crys­tal E. Ashby (2nd from left) and ELC Board Chair Tonie Leather­berry to wel­come ELC mem­bers to the 2020 Win­ter Meet­ing in Florida.
 ??  ?? The ELC’s Interim Pres­i­dent and CEO Crys­tal E. Ashby wel­comes ELC mem­bers to the 2020 Win­ter Meet­ing in Florida.
The ELC’s Interim Pres­i­dent and CEO Crys­tal E. Ashby wel­comes ELC mem­bers to the 2020 Win­ter Meet­ing in Florida.

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