Forbes

Soli­tude

Dis­con­nected

-

July 15, 1967

156

“The new tech­nol­ogy is mar­velous,” said an awed Frank Stan­ton, long­time pres­i­dent of the Columbia Broad­cast­ing Sys­tem. He could look up at the sky above his New York of­fice and en­vi­sion a time when satel­lites car­ried CBS’s news pro­grams far and wide. That’s cer­tainly the case to­day, and it’s not the only change in com­mu­ni­ca­tions that Forbes saw com­ing: ev­ery­thing from smart­phones—a.k.a. “minia­tur­ized ‘Dick Tracy’ phones,” as we called them—to in­for­ma­tion in­stantly avail­able via com­puter to a pro­lif­er­a­tion of tele­vi­sion chan­nels that would force any se­ri­ous pres­i­den­tial can­di­date to be “a pho­to­genic TV per­son­al­ity.” A few pre­dic­tions went awry, in­clud­ing that the U.S. Postal

Ser­vice, a “pon­der­ous in­sti­tu­tion” even in 1967, would go elec­tronic. But it was also clear that these in­no­va­tions would come with a cost, some­thing felt keenly in so­cially dis­tant 2020. “If our only main con­tact with peo­ple is

elec­tronic, then we can’t have real feel­ings,” warned

Dr. Harry Levin­son, an ex­pert on men­tal health at the Men­ninger Foun­da­tion in Topeka, Kansas. “We can’t know

each other . . . . We may get a vast knowl­edge of what’s go­ing on, but at the price of iso­lat­ing peo­ple.”

“Make your ego por­ous. Will is of lit­tle im­por­tance, com­plain­ing is noth­ing, fame is noth­ing. Open­ness, pa­tience, re­cep­tiv­ity, soli­tude is ev­ery­thing.”

—Rainer Maria Rilke

“The more you tell your story, your dreams and your en­tre­pre­neur­ial hopes, the more you will see that you’re not alone in ei­ther your striv­ing or your doubts.”

—Glo­ria Steinem

“Who­ever is de­lighted in soli­tude is ei­ther a wild beast or a god.”

—Fran­cis Ba­con

“It’s good for a per­son to spend time alone. It gives them an op­por­tu­nity to dis­cover who they are, and to fig­ure out why they’re al­ways alone.”

—Amy Sedaris

“I was never less alone than when by my­self.”

—Ed­ward Gib­bon

“Soli­tude is a kind of free­dom.”

—Um­berto Eco

“Every time I find my­self a lit­tle un­com­fort­able, I know I’m in the right place.”

—Cristina Mit­ter­meier

“To be an adult is to be alone.”

—Jean Ro­stand

“Lone­li­ness is the poverty of self; soli­tude is the rich­ness of self.”

—May Sar­ton

“Soli­tude is the fate of all out­stand­ing minds: It will at times be de­plored, but it will al­ways be cho­sen as the lesser of two evils.”

—Arthur Schopen­hauer

“Some­times the best way to fight is on the flank, not in the cen­ter of the ac­tiv­ity where your op­po­nent masses its own force.”

—Herb Kelle­her

“You can­not es­cape your­self, for God has sin­gled you out.”

—Di­et­rich Bon­ho­ef­fer

“Maybe this is who I re­ally am. Not a loner, ex­actly, but some­one who can be alone.”

—Gary Shteyn­gart

“This truth—to prove, and make thine own: ‘Thou hast been, shalt be, art, alone.’ ”

—Matthew Arnold

“Lone­li­ness is to en­dure the pres­ence of one who does not un­der­stand.”

—El­bert Hub­bard

“Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your hearts be trou­bled; nei­ther let them be afraid.”

—John 14:27

 ?? SOURCES: LETTERS TO A YOUNG POET, BY RAINER MARIA RILKE; OF FRIEND­SHIP, BY FRAN­CIS BA­CON; MEM­OIRS OF MY LIFE AND WRIT­INGS, BY ED­WARD GIB­BON; THOUGHTS OF A BI­OL­O­GIST, BY JEAN RO­STAND; MRS. STEVENS HEARS THE MER­MAID SINGING, BY MAY SAR­TON; APHORISMS FOR WIS ??
SOURCES: LETTERS TO A YOUNG POET, BY RAINER MARIA RILKE; OF FRIEND­SHIP, BY FRAN­CIS BA­CON; MEM­OIRS OF MY LIFE AND WRIT­INGS, BY ED­WARD GIB­BON; THOUGHTS OF A BI­OL­O­GIST, BY JEAN RO­STAND; MRS. STEVENS HEARS THE MER­MAID SINGING, BY MAY SAR­TON; APHORISMS FOR WIS

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