Pack­ing like a boss

DANE NOEDING SHOWS US HOW TO FIT A WEEK’S WORTH OF “EV­ERY­THING YOU NEED” IN YOUR CARRY-ON

Frequent Flyer Destinations - - CONTENTS -

Let’s face the facts: even those of us who en­joy air­line travel are faced with the dilemma of what to pack, how to pack it, and how many bags to bring? If you’re get­ting away for plea­sure, and you’re on your own time, it may not be some­thing you mind as much, but those of us trav­el­ing for business car­ry­ing in­valu­able items like lap­tops or business at­tire know there are quite a few in­con­ve­niences about the whole thing in gen­eral, es­pe­cially when it comes to check­ing your lug­gage.

Let’s see... giv­ing your­self enough time to get to the bag­gage check lane and then through se­cu­rity, fill­ing out one lost and found tag to wrap on your bag in the event it’s mis­placed, then the ex­tra 15-20 min­utes wait­ing for your lug­gage at the carousel when you get to where you’re go­ing and then again when you get home, the av­er­age $25 to check a bag and then any­where from $35-$50 for a sec­ond bag, the bal­anc­ing of you and your bag on your bath­room scale to en­sure it’s un­der 50 pounds, and then there is al­ways the lin­ger­ing angst that your bag is go­ing to be the one that will get lost. So, what do you do to ease the ail­ments of this cargo cart­ing. Easy, bring one bag and carry it on. Here’s how…

TSA GUIDE­LINES

First things first be­fore you get pack­ing. Know the rules the Trans­porta­tion Se­cu­rity Ad­min­is­tra­tion (aka the TSA) has set.

Now, what can and can’t you bring in a carry-on bag? It does dif­fer from what you can carry in your checked bag. Use gen­eral com­mon sense when con­sid­er­ing items to pack, but if you aren’t sure visit the TSA’s web page and dou­ble check be­fore pack­ing it. https://www.tsa.gov/travel/se­cu­ri­tyscreen­ing/what­canib­ring

The most im­por­tant TSA bul­let point when it comes to pack­ing a carry-on bag would be the liq­uid rules. What this means is you’re al­lowed to bring one quart-sized bag of liq­uids, aerosols, gels, creams and pastes in your carry-on bag through the se­cu­rity check­point. Most phar­ma­cies have a sec­tion full of these nifty lit­tle trav­el­sized con­tain­ers that are 3.4 ounces (100 milliliters) or less. Just be sure you place these items in a small bag and sep­a­rate them from your carry-on bag­gage, not only

is this the rule set by TSA, but it will save you a nasty clean up if one of these items breaks open dur­ing your trip.

BAG­GAGE LO­GIS­TICS

It’s all about the bag – by that I mean bag­gage. This can make or break whether you will be able to pack what you need or not. You can’t just pick any old bag ei­ther; it needs to meet air­line re­quire­ments. Poli­cies for carry-on bag­gage can vary some­what among air­lines and cer­tain flights based on the over­head space avail­able in the planes they are uti­liz­ing.

The gen­eral con­sen­sus is your bag shouldn’t ex­ceed 22 inches long, 14 inches wide and 9 inches tall. Air­lines usu­ally pro­vide a place to check the size of your carry-on near the check-in counter. If your bag fits in the hole, it is good to bring on the flight.

I per­son­ally stay away from hard suit­case style roller suit­cases. I pre­fer a back­pack ac­tu­ally. Some would ar­gue that a hard-sided suit­case with a struc­tured shell is bet­ter be­cause you can’t squeeze in ex­tras, and it pro­tects the con­tents. It’s a per­sonal pref­er­ence re­ally, but I feel the right back­pack can be the most ver­sa­tile com­po­nent in your lug­gage arse­nal. I use the OGIO Metro Back­pack, with demin­sions of 18”h x 13.5”w x 9”d. It’s far un­der the max­i­mum al­lot­ted size, yet has plenty of room.

There is a large com­part­ment for cloth­ing, a medium com­part­ment that fits toi­letries per­fectly, a cush­ioned back sec­tion for your lap­top/tablet, in­ter­nal file sleeve, deluxe or­ga­ni­za­tion panel, fleece-lined dig­i­tal me­dia/au­dio pock­ets with head­phone exit port, not to men­tion it’s weath­er­proofed. Summed up: it’s stocked with op­tions, and not only al­lows me to pack what I need, but keeps me or­ga­nized and al­lows for quick ac­cess.

Most air­lines al­low you to bring onto the plane one carry-on item and one per­sonal item. A per­sonal item can con­sist of a wide range of things like a lap­top bag, purse, di­a­per bag, etc. Items like coats or pil­lows would not count to­ward ei­ther al­lot­ment.

For those of us trav­el­ing on business, you know the strug­gle of bring­ing your for­mal business at­tire with­out get­ting wrin­kled. I use a gar­ment folder like Amer­iLeather’s Three-suit Gar­ment Bag to carry my business suits and dress shirt.

It neatly folds these items in half the size and keeps them from wrin­kling.

This par­tic­u­lar bag is the higher end of gar­ment fold­ers and has mul­ti­ple stor­age com­part­ments. At $109.99 it’s still very fairly priced for what you get, but if you’re look­ing for some­thing sim­ple you can ex­pect to pay as lit­tle as $30.00.

Trav­eler tip 101: When board­ing ask a flight at­ten­dant if you can hang your business at­tire. There are usu­ally a cou­ple of clos­ets in the front of the air­craft near the cabin and first class, and most of the time they will al­low you to uti­lize the space. No more wrin­kles and more space in your seat.

THE PACK­ING PLAN IN 3 STEPS

TRAV­ELER TIP 101: YOU CAN ASK AN AIR­LINE STAFF MEM­BER TO CHECK THE BAG AT THE GATE AT NO AD­DI­TIONAL CHARGE. THEY WILL PUT A SPE­CIAL TAG ON THE BAG AND YOU WILL USU­ALLY LEAVE YOUR BAG ON THE JET BRIDGE RIGHT BE­FORE EN­TER­ING THE PLANE. JUST RE­MEM­BER TO TAKE OUT ANY­THING YOU WILL NEED ON THE FLIGHT, LIKE MEDICINE. WHEN THE FLIGHT LANDS THE BAG WILL BE RE­TURNED TO THE JET BRIDGE FOR YOU TO TAKE BACK. ON A BUSY FLIGHT WHERE OVER­HEAD STOR­AGE IS SCARCE IT CAN SAVE YOU SOME LEG ROOM, IT’S AN IDEAL TRICK OF THE TRADE FOR YOU HARD-SIDED SUIT­CASE FANS.

1. Do the Math: Most of the time peo­ple over pack. The key is to bring the essentials. I use the 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 rule for a week­long trip. Limit your wardrobe to five sets of socks and un­der­wear, four tops (I like to do three V-necks and one polo for business ca­sual gather­ings. Note, I keep my but­ton-down shirts with my suit in a gar­ment folder), three bot­toms (usu­ally one pair of jeans, one khaki, one shorts, two pairs of shoes and one hat. The list should be ad­justed de­pend­ing on the weather, lo­ca­tion, and events you will be at­tend­ing. It’s not a bad idea to throw in a swim­suit and some gym ap­parel ei­ther, and oh yeah don’t for­get that suit or dress. 2. Lay out what you think you’ll need, toss out the “just in case”: I don’t know about you, but I never use all the clothes in my bag on a trip. There are al­ways a cou­ple of items I bring “just in case.” Think twice about ev­ery­thing you want to put in your bag. Fully get rid of the “just in case I need it” cat­e­gory un­less it’s in­valu­able. If and when you do need it, just buy it.

3. It’s a puz­zle: Most likely you’ll be fill­ing ev­ery inch of space, and you may want to give it a cou­ple of tries with some vari­a­tion to fig­ure out what works best. Don’t worry though; as long as you don’t pack last minute and aren’t rushed, you’ll have un­lim­ited lives in this game of car­ryon Tetris.

The way I like to do it is roll pairs of socks to­gether and stuff them in my shoes. Then lay your shoes to­gether heel to toe at the bot­tom of your suit­case in a plas­tic shop­ping bag to pro­tect clothes from dirt. Then I roll all of my threads; it makes far more space than folded clothes. If you don’t have an­other pocket for the bag of liq­uids and toi­letries, pack this last; re­mem­ber you’ll have to re­move it any­way when go­ing through se­cu­rity.

MORAL OF THE STORY

Re­mem­ber to pack the essentials first, the stuff the front desk at the ho­tel won’t have. Less is more. Yes, Un­cle Tony, that means your blood pres­sure medicine, and yes, At­ti­cus, if that el­der­berry-in­fused hip­ster beard balm you get from your fa­vorite café in Wil­liams­burg is as spe­cial as you say, bring that too; just be sure it’s less than 3.4 ounces.

The OGIO Metro Back­pack, with demin­sions of 18”h x 13.5”w x 9”d it’s far un­der the max­i­mum al­lot­ted size, yet has plenty of room.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.