MONEY-HUN­GRY MEGHAN TURNS BACK ON AMER­ICA!

Harry’s preg­nant bride toss­ing U.S. cit­i­zen­ship to avoid pay­ing taxes!

Globe - - BREAKING NEWS -

PRINCE HARRY’S greedy bride, Meghan, shame­fully plans to turn her back on Amer­ica and throw away her U.S. cit­i­zen­ship — with the urg­ing and bless­ing of Bri­tain’s royal fam­ily — all be­cause of money!

Ac­cord­ing to a highly placed source at the U.S. In­ter­nal Rev­enue Ser­vice, the former star of TV’s Suits, who’s worth an es­ti­mated $5 mil­lion, “is still an Amer­i­can cit­i­zen, so she has to pay tax in the U.S., and this could ex­tend to any­one else she draws money from — in­clud­ing her hus­band.”

That puts Harry’s $450,000 yearly al­lowance and re­port­edly ad­di­tional $2 mil­lion from his dad Charles in the IRS’ crosshairs, along with any dough fun­neled to the cou­ple from Harry’s grandma Queen El­iz­a­beth, say sources.

Even worse, Meghan’s U.S. cit­i­zen­ship gives the

IRS an op­por­tu­nity to poke around the hush-hush fi­nances of the monar­chy, says a palace in­sider.

The shock­ing tax night­mare has the fa­mously stingy and se­cre­tive roy­als on edge.

“We’re look­ing at a level of fi­nan­cial ex­po­sure the royal fam­ily has never had to face be­fore — and they don’t like it one bit,” says the palace aide. “The last thing the queen and her rel­a­tives want is U.S. tax in­ves­ti­ga­tors snoop­ing around their fi­nances. They are no­to­ri­ously thrifty — at least when it comes to their own money.

“The roy­als have been on Meghan’s back, telling her how much money she’ll lose if she re­mains a U.S. na­tional, push­ing her to give up cit­i­zen­ship.

“Com­ing from a strug­gling back­ground, ev­ery buck counts to her. Lis­ten­ing to her new rel­a­tives, Meghan’s eyes are light­ing up with dol­lar signs.”

While Meghan’s now mar­ried to Harry and car­ries the ti­tle Duchess of Sus­sex, she’s still liv­ing in Eng­land on a visa, and that puts her tax sit­u­a­tion in a jum­ble.

Even though she’ll likely spend most of her time in Eng­land, she’s still fair game for the IRS, which will want to know any amount over $100,000 she gets from her new fam­ily, says tax ex­pert Alis­tair Bam­bridge of Bam­bridge Ac­coun­tants, which has of­fices in New York and Lon­don.

“Meghan has to give the U.S. tax­man full de­tails of her fi­nances if she and her hus­band have joint as­sets, bank ac­counts or off­shore trusts in ex­cess of $200,000,” Bam­bridge says.

“Perks she re­ceives by join­ing the royal fam­ily such as the use of Not­ting­ham Cot­tage, prop­erty in the grounds of Kens­ing­ton Palace where she will live with Harry, need to be val­ued and de­clared, un­less she is pay­ing rent her­self.

“And fu­ture TV in­come, such as re­run fees, will all be taxed by the U.S. as long as she is a cit­i­zen.”

Me­gan was re­port­edly rak­ing in $450,000 a year from the hit le­gal drama Suits and en­dorse­ments. She will still be get­ting resid­u­als from re­runs.

She may even have to de­clare per­sonal items such as her $100,000 en­gage­ment ring and wed­ding dress.

“Her mar­riage to Harry, along with the em­bar­rass­ments of her trashy Amer­i­can fam­ily, and now the tax is­sue, is turn­ing into a hor­ror show for the roy­als,” says the in­sider.

Charles’ wife, Camilla, who has been bad-mouthing Meghan since be­fore the mar­riage to Harry, now has new am­mu­ni­tion to trash her with.

In an of­fi­cial state­ment, a palace spokesman tells GLOBE “there’s no truth” to chat­ter Meghan will break ties with Amer­ica. But the in­sider in­sists, “there’s no doubt with all the pres­sure from the roy­als and ac­coun­tants, Meghan will give up her U.S. cit­i­zen­ship.”

The Amer­i­can-born ac­tress in­tends to aban­don her home­land to en­sure the IRS can’t get their hands on her and her new hubby’s cash, source says

Royal perks like stay­ing at Kens­ing­ton Palace mayneed to be looked at by the IRS be­cause Meghan’sstill a U.S. cit­i­zen Queen El­iz­a­beth doesn’t want the hush-hush fi­nances of the monar­chy ex­posed, says spy

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