Con­necti­cut one of the skin­ni­est states, study finds

Greenwich Time - - FROM THE FRONT PAGE - By Amanda Cuda

The state, how­ever, didn’t fare as well as Col­orado, rated the skin­ni­est state by Wal­letHub, with Utah, Hawaii, Mas­sachusetts and the Dis­trict of Columbia round­ing out the slimmest five states.

Con­necti­cut is one of the 10 “skin­ni­est” states in the na­tion, ac­cord­ing to a study re­leased Tues­day by the fi­nan­cial web site Wal­letHub.

In honor of Novem­ber be­ing Na­tional Di­a­betes Month, the site ranked all 50 states and the Dis­trict of Columbia from “fat­test” (their word) to least fat, based on 25 met­rics, in­clud­ing the per­cent­age of the pop­u­la­tion that is obese and over­weight to sug­ary­bev­er­age con­sump­tion among ado­les­cents to obe­sity-re­lated health care costs.

Con­necti­cut ranked 44th, mak­ing it one of the slimmest states in the na­tion. In­deed, the State of Obe­sity re­port re­leased last month by the Trust for Amer­ica’s Health and the Robert Wood John­son Foun­da­tion, showed that Con­necti­cut’s obe­sity rate of 26.9 per­cent was the 10th low­est in the na­tion, although it was up from 16 per­cent in 2000.

The state, how­ever, didn’t fare as well as Col­orado, rated the skin­ni­est state by Wal­letHub, with Utah, Hawaii, Mas­sachusetts and the Dis­trict of Columbia round­ing out the slimmest five states. Mis­sis­sippi was ranked fat­test, fol­lowed by West Vir­ginia, Arkansas, Ken­tucky and Ten­nessee.

Be­ing over­weight or obese does in­crease a per­son’s risk of di­a­betes, which roughly 30 mil­lion Amer­i­cans have.

The Wal­letHub study cites re­cent data from the Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Preven­tion, show­ing that more than seven in 10 U.S. adults aged 20 and older are ei­ther over­weight or obese and the U.S. spends nearly $200 bil­lion in an­nual health care costs re­lated to obe­sity.

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