Re­mem­ber­ing Green­wich’s 33

More than 200 turn out in mem­ory of lives lost here and be­yond

Greenwich Time - - FRONT PAGE - By Ken Bor­suk

GREEN­WICH — A crowd qui­etly gath­ered Wed­nes­day to re­mem­ber the lives of the Green­wich res­i­dents who were killed in the Sept. 11, 2001, ter­ror at­tacks — 33 vic­tims whose names are per­ma­nently etched in the glass of the town’s me­mo­rial.

More than 200 peo­ple turned out in Cos Cob Park for the late­af­ter­noon ser­vice as a bell was rung for each of the 33 vic­tims and each of the names was read out loud.

Fam­ily and friends of the vic­tims, as well other town res­i­dents, placed flow­ers at the base of the me­mo­rial, which is made up of two glass tow­ers to rep­re­sent the World Trade Cen­ter.

An an­niver­sary me­mo­rial cer­e­mony has been held in town since

2002, tak­ing place first at Town Hall and then at the Glenville Vol­un­teer Fire Sta­tion and now at Cos Cob Park. In re­marks at the Cos Cob cer­e­mony on Wed­nes­day, state Rep. Fred Camillo urged those in at­ten­dance to keep the sig­nif­i­cance of the day in their minds.

He re­called how res­i­dents could once see the Twin Tow­ers from the Green­wich shore­line, and he thought back to the day of the at­tacks.

“All that re­mained would be a mem­ory and a re­solve,” Camillo said. “The mem­ory would be of a mag­nif­i­cent ar­chi­tec­tural achievemen­t and the re­solve was to never for­get the hate that was be­hind that ter­ri­ble de­struc­tion of that day and to en­deavor that it never hap­pened again.”

But to­day, Camillo said that has been joined by a new sky­line, “one that sig­ni­fies re­birth and re­vi­tal­iza­tion.”

“From the ashes has arisen a new sym­bol of progress and of spirit that can­not be bro­ken by hate nor ex­trem­ism,” Camillo said. “The peo­ple of Green­wich lost many of their sons and daugh­ters that day. They went to work not know­ing it would be their last day and when they died they took their hopes, dreams and fu­tures. But what did not per­ish, how­ever, was their lega­cies and their love of fam­ily, of friends, of freedom and of coun­try.”

It is up to ev­ery­one left be­hind, Camillo said, to carry on those lega­cies and pass the love of freedom onto the next gen­er­a­tion and en­sure that the re­solve born on Sept. 11, 2001, would re­main.

The me­mo­rial in Cos Cob Park was funded pri­vately, with the sup­port of the fam­i­lies of the lo­cal vic­tims, and then given to the town as a gift.

The fam­i­lies play an ac­tive role in the an­nual cer­e­mony held at the me­mo­rial. Wells Noo­nan, whose brother Robert was killed in the at­tacks, led this year’s pro­gram. And the names of all of Green­wich’s vic­tims were read by Lind­say and Tier­ney Maloney, the nieces of Teddy Maloney. His daugh­ter, Teddy, rang the me­mo­rial bell for each victim.

Af­ter the cer­e­mony, Teddy Maloney’s mother, Sally, spoke about the 18th an­niver­sary of her son’s death.

“It’s been so dif­fi­cult, and I don’t know why. But it’s been a lit­tle more this year than some in the past,” she said. “It shocks me that this pain doesn’t wain a lit­tle bit each year. It starts a cou­ple of days be­fore the ac­tual cer­e­mony and goes through to­day and a lit­tle bit to­mor­row.

“Then I get back to nor­mal, and I think if I didn’t have my job and was busy full time, it would be a lot worse,” she said.

Hun­dreds turned out to show their sup­port, which Maloney said she truly ap­pre­ci­ates.

“It’s so lovely,” she said. “Teddy was one of the most beloved peo­ple that any­body ever knew . ... He was called a pied piper and a guardian an­gel to a lot.”

At the close of the cer­e­mony, an honor guard made up of mem­bers of the Green­wich Po­lice De­part­ment and the Green­wich Fire De­part­ment led a pro­ces­sion to the me­mo­rial along with mem­bers of the Boys & Girls Club of Green­wich.

The Cos Cob cer­e­mony has be­come a tra­di­tion since the me­mo­rial was ded­i­cated at the park in 2015.

The town also held a sec­ond cer­e­mony Wed­nes­day evening at the Glenville Fire De­part­ment, where there is a me­mo­rial cre­ated from a piece of steel re­cov­ered from the World Trade Cen­ter.

Mem­bers of the Glenville Vol­un­teer Fire Com­pany and rep­re­sen­ta­tives of all of Green­wich’s first re­spon­ders, saluted their fallen brethren who bravely rushed to the scene af­ter the ter­ror at­tacks on the World Trade Cen­ter.

As part of the cer­e­mony, a wreath was placed at the steel beam me­mo­rial.

Tyler Size­more / Hearst Con­necti­cut Me­dia

An honor guard leads a pro­ces­sion dur­ing the Sept. 11 Re­mem­brance Ser­vice at Cos Cob Park Wed­nes­day. More than 200 peo­ple at­tended the cer­e­mony on the 18­year an­niver­sary of the 9/11 at­tacks on the World Trade Cen­ter.

Names of the Green­wich res­i­dents lost in the at­tacks were read aloud, fol­lowed by a pre­sen­ta­tion of col­ors by the Green­wich Po­lice and Boys & Girls Club of Green­wich honor guards and a rose­plac­ing at the me­mo­rial.

Tyler Size­more / Hearst Con­necti­cut Me­dia

The Sept. 11 Re­mem­brance Ser­vice at Cos Cob Park on Wed­nes­day.

Names of the 33 Green­wich res­i­dents lost in the at­tacks were read aloud, fol­lowed by a pre­sen­ta­tion of col­ors by the Green­wich Po­lice and Boys & Girls Club of Green­wich honor guards and a rose­plac­ing at the me­mo­rial.

More than 200 peo­ple at­tended the cer­e­mony on the 18­year an­niver­sary of the 9/11 at­tacks on the World Trade Cen­ter.

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