OP­TICS

THE VORTEX STRIKE EA­GLE COULD BE THE SIN­GLE AR OP­TIC TO SPEND YOUR HARDEARNED MONEY ON.

Gun World - - Contents -

The Vortex Strike Ea­gle’s 1-8x24 ri­fle­scope is as­tound­ing for a few rea­sons.

Pri­mar­ily be­cause the gi­nor­mous 8x mag­ni­fi­ca­tion range it of­fers is still pretty new on the mar­ket, and there are few play­ers of­fer­ing such tech­nol­ogy. In fact, even 6x mag­ni­fi­ca­tion range scopes are still rel­a­tively new, with manufacturers in­tro­duc­ing this new-to-them tech­nol­ogy

ev­ery year. The 6x-range scopes still have a lot of stay­ing power, and new in­tro­duc­tions are not yet late to the game.

But the 8x range has been of­fered by se­lect few oth­ers so far—and fewer still that are not at the nose­bleed high-price level. Sev­eral of these 8x scopes de­liver sig­nif­i­cant dis­tor­tion and tun­nel vi­sion at low­est pow­ers. The Strike Ea­gles do not.

I first used a 6x mag­ni­fi­ca­tion range scope when pre­par­ing for an elk hunt in Colorado with Bur­ris Op­tics in 2009. That newly in­tro­duced Six X 2-12x40 on my Weatherby helped me col­lect a nice elk. My con­fi­dence on that hunt was in­creased by us­ing the new 6x mag­ni­fi­ca­tion range tech­nol­ogy that pro­duced a huge field of view at 2x to an im­age large enough at 12x for com­fort­able shots at 300 yards and past. What a very useable dif­fer­ence from the older, fa­vorite 3.5-10x scopes I used a lot! And the Strike Ea­gle fea­tured here has an even greater 8x mag­ni­fi­ca­tion range.

THE AMAZ­ING STRIKE EA­GLE

An­other rea­son the Strike Ea­gle is as­tound­ing is its sub$400 street price. New tech­nol­ogy costs money, and to be one of the first on the mar­ket with it costs more. For an 8x scope from a rep­utable com­pany to be this af­ford­able makes my head spin. The flip-up caps are in­cluded, but the Vortex SV-2 Switchview (made by MGM Tar­gets) throw lever shown in the pic­tures is avail­able as an ac­ces­sory for about $50. The at­trac­tive Strike Ea­gle has a pleas­ing and uni­form satin-black color.

I play with or test most scopes on the mar­ket even­tu­ally for some rea­son or an­other, and there’s a lot more to scopes than meets the eye, so to speak.

LIKE BUT­TER

Ac­tu­ally look­ing through the scope is the last thing I do. I first go about mov­ing the mag­ni­fi­ca­tion ring from stop to stop, feel­ing through my fin­ger­tips for grind­ing, hard spots, The SV-4 Switchview throw lever, made by MGM Tar­gets, is avail­able as an ac­ces­sory and makes

the mag­ni­fi­ca­tion ring ad­just­ment seem

even smoother. The tur­rets have no frills; in­stead, they fea­ture crisp, re­peat­able clicks. Ro­tate the slid­ing col­lar to re­set zero. loos­en­ing from ini­tial use, how it pos­i­tively stops when at the lim­its—and, over­all, how happy it makes me feel. This scope was ex­cep­tional and bet­ter than the sev­eral 1-6x Strike Ea­gles I’ve got­ten to know. It was silky-smooth from “low” to “high” power, with noth­ing in be­tween but but­ter. The Switchview throw lever makes it feel even silkier.

The next thing I do is test the tur­rets. These tur­rets have no fancy stuff; just solid tac­tile and au­di­ble clicks—ex­actly how you hope they would be on all scopes ... but rarely are. These move as surely as the clicks on a mini Snap-On ratchet. The tur­rets are low and capped. The re­tail price is kept as low as pos­si­ble by omit­ting frills, and the tur­ret is a case in point. The min­i­mal­ist in me ap­pre­ci­ates how they only move the cen­tered ret­i­cle and don’t pull up and twist, or have a zero-stop, but­tons or any­thing un­nec­es­sary. Once your gun is sighted in, use your fin­ger­nail or screw­driver to ro­tate the ad­just­ment dial on the tur­ret top to zero and re-cap. Shoot. Re­peat.

I tested the ad­just­ments on a tape mea­sure at 100 yards. A full revo­lu­tion of the tur­rets moved the ret­i­cle the cor­rect 46 inches (44 real MOA). They were per­fectly re­peat­able. The 100-yard fac­tory par­al­lax set­ting made lit­tle dif­fer­ence, even when us­ing it at much-nearer .22 LR ranges—although par­al­lax er­ror is ap­par­ent at high power at closer dis­tances. The Vortex Pre­ci­sion Can­tilever mount I used to mount the scope was made by Amer­i­can De­fense Man­u­fac­tur­ing. It re­turned to zero within an inch ev­ery time.

The third tur­ret on the left side ad­justs ret­i­cle bright­ness. It is marked from 1 to 11 and has no “off” po­si­tion be­tween num­bers. In­stall your CR2032 bat­tery here for 150 hours of use. There is an ex­tra bat­tery holder neatly en­sconced in the windage tur­ret cap. The glass-etched sec­ond fo­cal plane ARBDC2 ret­i­cle cor­re­sponds to most 5.56/.223 and 7.62/.308 bal­lis­tics, and the large cir­cle that Vortex calls a “halo” draws your eye to the cen­ter for quick ac­qui­si­tion on large or mov­ing tar­gets.

TOP CON­TENDER

The 1-8x24 scope, it­self, grew a bit over its older brother—the 1-6x ver­sion of the Strike Ea­gle. More mag­ni­fi­ca­tion range means more parts, and the 1-8x grew by about a half-inch

in length and a lit­tle over 1 ounce. Not much dif­fer­ence to no­tice. The field of view on “low” power less­ened by 0.1 inch, and the 3.5-inch eye re­lief stayed con­stant.

Op­ti­cal qual­ity is also very good. This Strike Ea­gle would be a per­fect match for an AR and the way most shoot­ers use them. It will be a fun choice for plink­ing and range use, as well as a great starter com­pe­ti­tion op­tic. The ver­sa­til­ity makes it a su­perb choice for pig hunt­ing in most con­di­tions.

If you’re look­ing for the most use­ful and en­joy­able sin­gle AR op­tic to spend your hard-earned money on, this Strike Ea­gle would be a top con­tender. GW

AN­OTHER REA­SON THE STRIKE EA­GLE IS AS­TOUND­ING IS THE SUB-$400 STREET PRICE. NEW TECH­NOL­OGY COSTS MONEY, AND TO BE ONE OF THE FIRST ON THE MAR­KET WITH IT COSTS MORE.

The Vortex Strike Ea­gle has great looks to go along with its gi­ant, 8x mag­ni­fi­ca­tion range.

The Strike Ea­gle could be the sin­gle AR op­tic to spend your hard-earned money on. The Vortex Pre­ci­sion QR Can­tilever Mount was made by ADM and re­turned to zero within an inch ev­ery time.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.