THE NA­TURE OF DE­SIGN

ED­MUND HOL­LAN­DER’S FLY­ING POINT BEACH HOUSE LETS NA­TURE TAKE CEN­TER STAGE. BY PAULA DE LA CRUZ

Hamptons Magazine - - Contents -

Ed­mund Hol­lan­der’s Fly­ing Point beach house lets na­ture take cen­ter stage.

The crash­ing waves of the At­lantic are the main theme of the Hamp­tons’ am­bi­ent sym­phony. The ocean air that con­veys the sound into our homes also car­ries the un­mis­tak­able scents of the sea­son, stir­ring our memories of the tastes and tex­tures of sum­mers past. The best beach gar­dens em­brace ev­ery sen­sory el­e­ment, trans­port­ing us back to the wa­ter, the wind, the sand, and the sun. Hol­lan­der De­sign re­cently fin­ished an ocean­front pro­ject at Fly­ing Point that brings all these com­po­nents into con­cert.

“The na­tive gar­den we de­signed at Fly­ing Point suc­ceeds be­cause it en­gages all the senses,” says founder Ed­mund Hol­lan­der, whose firm won a 2016 Honor Award from the Amer­i­can So­ci­ety of Land­scape Ar­chi­tects for the en­tire res­i­dence. Lo­cated next to a park­ing area paved with re­cy­cled crushed oys­ter shells, the gar­den is sit­u­ated in an open court be­low the con­crete body of the el­e­vated main house.

Hol­lan­der De­sign re­stored the dune in front of the two pavil­ions by re­mov­ing in­va­sive species and re­plant­ing na­tive beach grass ( Am­mophila bre­viligu­lata). “It’s re­ally in­dis­tin­guish­able where Mother Na­ture’s dune ends and our man-made dune starts,” says Hol­lan­der.

Beach grass is planted from plugs, and its roots form a mesh that holds the dune to­gether. Rose shrubs hide the gap be­tween the ground and the el­e­vated floor. Along the sides of the prop­erty and the board­walk lead­ing to the ocean, North­ern bay­ber­ries ( Myrica pen­syl­van­ica) are a great source of food for mi­gra­tory song­birds. Near the pool house, sea­side gold­en­rod at­tracts thou­sands of monarch but­ter­flies in the fall, when the grasses be­gin to lose their vi­brant greens.

As with most Hamp­tons con­struc­tion projects, “It started with an old house,” notes Hol­lan­der. As the de­sign team de­vel­oped the new site, it be­came clear that the ar­chi­tec­ture would have to cede the spot­light to the nat­u­ral land­scape. Unim­peded by beams and with few win­dow frames, the first view of the ocean from inside the house in­evitably yields an aha mo­ment, with the in­doors be­com­ing the great out­doors. “There is a di­rect re­sponse of col­ors be­tween ar­chi­tec­ture and na­ture,” Hol­lan­der adds. Fur­ther, the pool house is made of glass, and the zero-edge pool seems to dis­ap­pear as it re­flects the sky and veg­e­ta­tion. The ar­chi­tec­ture is bold but not heavy, and al­though the de­sign is rooted very much in the now, its min­i­mal­ism makes it clas­sic.

Hol­lan­der De­sign em­ployed only a hand­ful of plant species to com­pose this land­scape, just as very few ma­te­ri­als are used in the ar­chi­tec­ture. Sen­si­tive to the lo­cal ecol­ogy, this Fly­ing Point house is an ex­er­cise in re­straint. “It comes from na­ture,” says Hol­lan­der. Never does a gar­den suc­ceed more than when it qui­etly com­ple­ments the sim­plic­ity and magic of the nat­u­ral world. Hol­lan­der De­sign, 200 Park Ave. S., Ste. 1200, NYC, 212-473-0620; hol­lan­derde­sign.com

“THERE IS A DI­RECT RE­SPONSE OF COL­ORS BE­TWEEN AR­CHI­TEC­TURE AND NA­TURE.” — ed­mund hol­lan­der

At this award­win­ning Fly­ing Point home de­signed by Ed­mund Hol­lan­der, the dunescape was fully re­stored, re­plac­ing all the in­va­sive plants with na­tive species to sta­bi­lize the frag­ile dune soils.

left: A raised wooden walk­way ex­tends from the res­i­dence, along the back of the pool house, and out to the ocean. right: The sim­ple jux­ta­po­si­tion of the main house, pool house, and pool re­sults in a beau­ti­fully min­i­mal­ist land­scape.

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