MIND THE GAP

These com­pa­nies go to ex­treme lengths to achieve equal pay for equal work

Inc. (USA) - - LAUNCH -

SALESFORCE.COM In 2015, the San Fran­cisco-based CRM com­pany an­a­lyzed its pay­roll and then spent $3 mil­lion to close the pay gap it found. This year, it spent an­other $3 mil­lion top­ping up salaries when an­other au­dit showed that the gap had re­turned. “It’s a mov­ing tar­get,” wrote EVP Cindy Rob­bins at the time. “It must be con­sis­tently mon­i­tored and ad­dressed.”

BUF­FER The so­cial me­dia man­age­ment plat­form, based in San Fran­cisco, posts a list of its salaries, as well as the for­mula it uses to de­ter­mine them. The trans­parency has helped the com­pany get closer to a near-zero wage gap for those in sim­i­lar roles, says spokesper­son Hail­ley Griffis, and com­pany-wide, the gap be­tween male and fe­male em­ploy­ees is now $2,400 per year, down from the $9,500 found in the first salary au­dit. “We still have more work to do to get to zero,” says Griffis.

SKILLSHARE This on­line learn­ing com­pany in New York City ended salary ne­go­ti­a­tions in April 2017 af­ter a re­view found that good ne­go­tia­tors were mak­ing up to $10,000 per year more than oth­ers with sim­i­lar jobs, says COO Matt Cooper. To­day, “take it or leave it” of­fers are based on a sim­ple grid that as­signs salary ac­cord­ing to job type and skill level. Cooper says the new pol­icy has helped the com­pany achieve gen­der wage par­ity and hasn’t hurt its hir­ing spree–the 50-em­ployee com­pany added 15 staffers since it was adopted.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.