WOMEN FOR PROGRESS

WHEN JEN­NIFER PIEROTTI LIM AND MEGHAN MILLOY FELT THE REPUB­LI­CAN PARTY WASN’T DO­ING ENOUGH TO SPEAK UP FOR WOMEN, THEY DE­CIDED TO ACT FROM WITHIN

InStyle (USA) - - Directory -

Repub­li­cans Jen­nifer Pierotti Lim and Meghan Milloy are tak­ing a stand for the women in their party

Life­long Repub­li­cans Jen­nifer Pierotti Lim and Meghan Milloy both grew up in con­ser­va­tive Bi­ble Belt fam­i­lies, cam­paigned for Ge­orge W. Bush, and en­dorse fis­cal poli­cies that lower taxes to boost the econ­omy. But they ad­mit to feel­ing aban­doned by their party in 2016, when Don­ald Trump clinched the GOP’S pres­i­den­tial nom­i­na­tion. “We weren’t OK at all with what Trump was say­ing about women and mi­nori­ties,” says Lim, the for­mer di­rec­tor of health pol­icy at the U. S. Cham­ber of Com­merce. So she and Milloy founded Repub­li­can Women for Hil­lary, a vol­un­teer group that am­pli­fied the voices of like-minded mod­er­ates and cam­paigned for Hil­lary Clin­ton.

Post-elec­tion, the duo con­tin­ued to speak out against Trump’s rhetoric by launch­ing the non­profit Repub­li­can Women for Progress (RWFP), an in­cu­ba­tor for GOP can­di­dates. Milloy, a fi­nan­cial-pol­icy and law ex­pert, says, “We be­lieve if more women were ad­e­quately equipped to run for of­fice in 2016, we cer­tainly wouldn’t be where we are now.” WHATTHEYDOIN ad­di­tion to help­ing can­di­dates de­velop their plat­forms and me­dia strate­gies, RWFP hosts networking and is­sue-driven events for po­ten­tial and cur- rent fe­male GOP can­di­dates. “We look for women who will work across the aisle and lead in­de­pen­dently in­stead of rub­ber-stamp­ing ev­ery­thing that comes out of the cur­rent ad­min­is­tra­tion,” Lim says. SEEINGREDMILLOY says she, like many can­di­dates RWFP sup­ports, does not fully agree with the ad­min­is­tra­tion’s stance on is­sues such as im­mi­gra­tion and for­eign re­la­tions. Then why stick around? “I think we have more cred­i­bil­ity if we crit­i­cize our party from within as op­posed to yelling from the out­side, ‘ I don’t want any­thing to do with y’all, but you should be do­ing X,Y, and Z,’ ” she says.

MIDTERMMADNESS

Both women are con­cerned that GOP can­di­dates could be in a lose-lose sce­nario at the polls this year, in part due to an out­moded stance on women’s is­sues, which Lim is not afraid to call out. “We have be­come much more com­fort­able say­ing what we think and are not afraid to piss peo­ple off,” Lim says. “The Repub­li­can Party has ab­di­cated lead­er­ship on any is­sues that af­fect women.” Milloy agrees, say­ing, “We re­ally have some­thing to fight for. It’s em­pow­er­ing to be our breed of Repub­li­can, fight­ing to bring the party back to days of de­cency.” THEWINFOR now, RWFP wants change, pre­fer­ring can­di­dates on the bal­lot who would serve as a check on the Trump ad­min­is­tra­tion over can­di­dates who would blindly fall in line with it, even if that means a Demo­cratic strong­hold in Congress come Novem­ber. “Frankly, we’re never go­ing to ad­vance in ei­ther party or as a coun­try if it’s just the same group of mid­dle-aged white dudes run­ning for of­fice and win­ning these seats,” Milloy says. UPNEXT “Our five-to-10-year plan is to be the EMILY’S List for mod­er­ate Repub­li­can women,” Milloy says, re­fer­ring to the well-known po­lit­i­cal ac­tion com­mit­tee for pro­choice Demo­cratic women. “We’re stick­ing around to em­power women to be more in­volved in pol­i­tics,” she adds. “Which is a need that will ex­tend be­yond what­ever hap­pens to the GOP in the next two years.”

Trump doesn’t rep­re­sent us. He can­not be the fu­ture of the GOP.” —JEN­NIFER PIEROTTI LIM

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.