Goat known for roam­ing I-65 has found a new home in Meade County

Lexington Herald-Leader - - Local - BY KARLA WARD [email protected]­ald-leader.com

Hou­dini, the goat that once made his home along­side In­ter­state 65 out­side El­iz­a­beth­town, won’t be seen stand­ing atop con­crete bar­ri­ers and guard rails any­more.

The white billy goat that star­tled and amused I-65 trav­el­ers is now liv­ing a life of ease at Broad­bent Wildlife Sanc­tu­ary in Meade County.

The sanc­tu­ary posted pho­tos on its Face­book page, say­ing that Hou­dini was re­leased into his new, five-acre pen on Tues­day morn­ing.

“This is a big and happy step for­ward in his jour­ney,” the fa­cil­ity said.

Hou­dini had been un­der the guardian­ship of Hardin County An­i­mal Care and Con­trol since Oc­to­ber, when he was in­jured in a traf­fic ac­ci­dent.

The Hardin County judge-ex­ec­u­tive’s of­fice is­sued a news re­lease

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WE DON’T THINK HE’LL BE CLIMB­ING UP ON GUARDRAILS ANY­MORE, BUT THERE’S NO WAY TO KNOW EX­ACTLY WHAT HE’LL BE CA­PA­BLE OF DO­ING EVEN­TU­ALLY. HE’S A PRETTY TOUGH GUY!

Broad­bent Wildlife Sanc­tu­ary, in a Face­book post

Thurs­day an­nounc­ing the de­ci­sion to trans­fer Hou­dini to the sanc­tu­ary.

Ac­cord­ing to the re­lease, Judge-Ex­ec­u­tive Harry Berry had ap­pointed a six-mem­ber com­mit­tee to study pos­si­bil­i­ties for a fu­ture home for the goat.

“The com­mit­tee unan­i­mously rec­om­mended Broad­bent Wildlife Sanc­tu­ary in Gus­ton, Ken­tucky. After re­view­ing the com­mit­tee’s de­ci­sion brief, I fully con­cur and have signed a de­ci­sion me­moran­dum to au­tho­rize his trans­fer,” Berry said in the re­lease. “I ap­pre­ci­ate the com­mit­tee’s work and I am pleased Hou­dini has a new home that will pro­vide him the proper re­sources to live out the re­main­der of his life in a safe, lov­ing and peace­ful en­vi­ron­ment.”

Hou­dini be­came some­thing of a leg­end be­cause of his life on the high­way, and state po­lice grew ac­cus­tomed to re­ceiv­ing calls from mo­torists who were con­cerned about his wel­fare, ac­cord­ing to the News-En­ter­prise in El­iz­a­beth­town, which cov­ered his rise to fame and sub­se­quent in­jury and re­cov­ery. Ac­cord­ing to the judge-ex­ec­u­tive’s re­lease, Hou­dini’s “ag­gres­sive na­ture and de­sire to be out of cap­tiv­ity” had made it hard for veterinarians to treat his bro­ken leg. The cost of his care was off­set by do­na­tions from the com­mu­nity.

Broad­bent said in a Face­book post Mon­day night that Hou­dini will likely have a per­ma­nent limp as a re­sult of a se­vere break that “tried to heal on its own and failed to fuse.”

The in­jury was painful, and the goat would not have been able to live with it out on the in­ter­state, ac­cord­ing to Broad­bent.

After ar­riv­ing at the sanc­tu­ary on Fri­day, he was eval­u­ated over the week­end by the fa­cil­ity’s staff vet­eri­nar­ian and a vet­eri­nar­ian from Mi­ami.

“Hou­dini is in good spir­its and get­ting friend­lier with our staff,” the or­ga­ni­za­tion said in its post on Mon­day. “He was con­tained in a small area for quite some time in or­der to pro­tect his leg, and as you can imag­ine, prob­a­bly wasn’t too happy about it. We have plenty of room at Broad­bent for him, but have to be care­ful not to let him dam­age his leg fur­ther. We don’t think he’ll be climb­ing up on guardrails any­more, but there’s no way to know ex­actly what he’ll be ca­pa­ble of do­ing even­tu­ally. He’s a pretty tough guy!”

He is still be­ing mon­i­tored around the clock, the fa­cil­ity said Tues­day.

The fa­cil­ity said vis­i­tors will be able to see Hou­dini at some point in the fu­ture. Broad­bent is open to mem­bers of the pub­lic by ap­point­ment only, ac­cord­ing to its web­site.

BROAD­BENT WILDLIFE SANC­TU­ARY Face­book

Hou­dini, the goat that for­merly lived along­side In­ter­state 65, was re­leased into a five-acre pen at Broad­bent Wildlife Sanc­tu­ary on Tues­day.

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