OPIN­ION

Marlin - - CONTENTS DEPARTMENTS -

MARK WALDRON, VIK­ING YACHT CO. NEW GRETNA, NEW JER­SEY

Faux teak is ideal for us be­cause the cus­tomer can add it at any point in the build — it does not change our man­u­fac­tur­ing process. With our faux-teak tran­soms and toe rails, it’s just a mat­ter of hav­ing an artist paint the ex­ist­ing fiber­glass. Our toe rails are molded parts of the deck­houses, so us­ing teak re­quires a mold mod­i­fi­ca­tion and ad­di­tional fiber­glass prepa­ra­tion for both the tran­som and deck­house. Faux teak gives us greater flex­i­bil­ity as a builder, and that’s one of the rea­sons we’ve seen a rise in our use of it over the past four years or so.

MARK WIL­LIS, WIL­LIS MARINE STU­ART, FLORIDA

Faux teak is a mod­ern re­al­ity as it be­comes in­creas­ingly dif­fi­cult to source qual­ity teak lum­ber. Per­son­ally, I find faux to be a great as­set, and use it ex­ten­sively in place of gen­uine teak. The faux coun­ter­part is nearly a for­ever so­lu­tion, es­pe­cially where teak toe rails can crack and check in the trop­i­cal sun. When done prop­erly, faux teak is very dif­fi­cult to dis­tin­guish from gen­uine teak, and given the green state of mind of the en­tire in­dus­try, any­thing we can do to help sus­tain for­est prod­ucts or in­crease the longevity of a fin­ished com­po­nent is a step in the right di­rec­tion.

JOHN FLOYD, F&S BOAT WORKS BEAR, DELAWARE

As a custom builder, we pre­fer to let our crafts­man­ship shine through the medium of real wood at ev­ery op­por­tu­nity in our fur­ni­ture, mold­ings, tran­soms and toe rails. Our in­dus­try is fac­ing a daunt­ing chal­lenge in sourc­ing very high-qual­ity old­growth teak planks, and we have em­braced faux teak as a vi­able so­lu­tion, but the fi­nal de­ci­sion is al­ways the cus­tomer’s to make. For­tu­nately, there are some great artists whose work is al­most in­dis­tin­guish­able from real wood, and as this old-growth teak be­comes harder to find, the faux painted al­ter­na­tive seems poised to be­come even more preva­lent in the com­ing years.

MICHAEL RYBOVICH, MICHAEL RYBOVICH & SONS BOAT WORKS PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

The scarcity of good teak and qual­i­fied la­bor is prob­a­bly driv­ing the faux trend, along with an overly op­ti­mistic as­sump­tion that less main­te­nance is re­quired. It took us about a year of search­ing through lum­ber­yards be­fore we found an ac­cept­able board for the tran­som on our lat­est boat, so I un­der­stand the frus­tra­tion as­so­ci­ated with real wood se­lec­tion. I am, how­ever, re­luc­tant to adopt the prac­tice on boats of this cal­iber un­til we are forced into it by the in­abil­ity to ac­quire ad­e­quate sticks. Fake news, fake boobs, fake teak. Where have all the woodys gone?

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