OPIN­ION

Marlin - - CONTENTS DEPARTMENTS -

JIMMY FIELDS, TOUR­NA­MENT YACHT SALES TEQUESTA, FLORIDA

En­gine and bot­tom main­te­nance is first and fore­most. Noth­ing will sour a deal quicker than a po­ten­tial buyer think­ing, If the owner didn’t spend the time or money to do the 1,000-hour ser­vice, what else hasn’t he

kept up with? Bot­tom and en­gine main­te­nance go hand in hand, es­pe­cially dur­ing an en­gine sur­vey, where sea tri­als re­veal proper en­gine per­for­mance and ver­ify the speeds ad­ver­tised in the list­ing, both at cruise and top-end. Ne­glect­ing these items adds to the bot­tom line and is not fac­tored in when mak­ing an of­fer to pur­chase. Ba­sic main­te­nance is ex­pected to be com­pleted

by the seller.

JEFF C REAR Y, HMY YACHT SALES DA­NIA BEACH, FLORIDA

Ed­u­cat­ing the client on their ves­sel’s cur­rent mar­ket value is crit­i­cal. If you com­mu­ni­cate di­rectly from the start, you can set a re­al­is­tic sale ex­pec­ta­tion and cre­ate a sound level of com­fort in your bro­ker-client re­la­tion­ship. Price drives sales traf­fic, so if an ask­ing price is un­re­al­is­tic, that traf­fic is de­creased. My goal is to pro­vide the ut­most cus­tomer ser­vice by get­ting the boat sold as quickly as pos­si­ble for the most amount of money, so have your clients ask them­selves: How much is my boat cost­ing me while it sits at the dock for sale?

JOEY AK UP, SOUTH JER­SEY YACHT SALES POINT PLEAS­ANT, NEW JER­SEY

Be­fore bring­ing a boat to mar­ket, both the seller and bro­ker should go over all the main­te­nance records in de­tail. Clients who are able to pro­duce yard bills and en­gine ser­vice his­tory show a po­ten­tial buyer two things: They have taken the boat’s safety and main­te­nance se­ri­ously, and they are or­ga­nized, with noth­ing to hide. A buyer will re­quest these records be pro­duced prior to mov­ing for­ward by sched­ul­ing a sur­vey. A boat with a well-doc­u­mented ser­vice his­tory will be much eas­ier to move, ul­ti­mately mak­ing the en­tire sell­ing and buy­ing ex­pe­ri­ence as smooth and seam­less as pos­si­ble.

JUD BLACK, BLUE­WA­TER YACHT SALES HAMP­TON, VIR­GINIA

While there are many im­por­tant fac­tors to con­sider, I’ve found be­ing cer­tain the boat is show-ready prior to list­ing is the most im­por­tant fac­tor. There will al­ways be a flurry of ex­cite­ment and ac­tiv­ity when a ves­sel first hits the mar­ket, so hav­ing the boat in show con­di­tion is im­per­a­tive. If the bro­ker has to start mak­ing ex­cuses right away, the ex­cite­ment will be dulled — for the prospec­tive buyer and the bro­ker. You never get a sec­ond chance to make a first im­pres­sion, and that adage cer­tainly ap­plies in this case.

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