Miami Herald (Sunday)

Civilians escape Kherson after Russian strikes on freed city

- BY SAM MEDNICK AND JAMEY KEATEN Associated Press

KHERSON, UKRAINE

Fleeing shelling, civilians on Saturday streamed out of the southern Ukrainian city whose recapture they celebrated weeks earlier.

The exodus from Kherson came as Ukraine solemnly remembered a Stalin-era famine and sought to ensure that Russia’s war in Ukraine doesn’t deprive others worldwide of its vital food exports.

A line of trucks, vans and cars, some towing trailers or ferrying out pets and other belongings, stretched a kilometer or more on the outskirts of the city of Kherson.

Days of intensive shelling by Russian forces prompted a bitterswee­t exodus: Many civilians were happy that their city had been won back, but lamented that they couldn’t stay.

“It is sad that we are leaving our home,” said Yevhen Yankov, as a van he was in inched forward. “Now we are free, but we have to leave, because there is shelling, and there are dead among the population.”

Poking her head out from the back, Svitlana Romanivna added: “We went through real hell. Our neighborho­od was burning, it was a nightmare. Everything was in flames.”

Emilie Fourrey, emergency project coordinato­r for aid group Doctors Without Borders in Ukraine, said an evacuation of 400 patients of Kherson’s psychiatri­c hospital, which is situated near both an electrical plant and the frontline, had begun on Thursday and was set to continue in the coming days.

Ukraine in recent days has faced a blistering onslaught of Russian artillery fire and drone attacks, with the shelling especially intense in Kherson. Often the barrage has largely targeted infrastruc­ture, though civilian casualties have been reported. Repair crews across the country were scrambling to restore heat, electricit­y and water services that were blasted into disrepair.

Russia has ratcheted up its attacks on critical infrastruc­ture after suffering battlefiel­d setbacks. A prominent Russian nationalis­t said Saturday the Russian military doesn’t have enough doctors, in what was a rare public admission of problems within the military.

In the capital Kyiv, President Volodymyr Zelenskyy oversaw a busy day of diplomacy, welcoming several European Union leaders for meetings and hosting an “Internatio­nal Summit on Food Security” to discuss food security and agricultur­al exports from the country.

The prime ministers of Belgium, Poland and Lithuania and the president of Hungary were on hand, and many others participat­ed by video.

Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal said Ukraine — despite its own financial straits — has allocated $24 million to purchase corn for countries including Yemen, Sudan, Kenya and Nigeria.

Zelenskyy said Ukraine was working to get its grain when you sit with them and spend time with them, relationsh­ips can be built on … other means than just language alone: sharing experience­s, sharing that same space and just having a feeling of respect. Your body language changes when you have respect for someone or something.”

Mackey grew up with Pentecosta­l roots on his father’s side and Baptist on his mother’s. He still occasional­ly attends church, but finds more meaning in Cherokee ceremonial practices.

“Even if [tribal members] on ships and to countries that need it.

“Our goal is ambitious and specific — to save at least 5 million people from hunger,” Zelenskyy said.

Last year Ukraine and Russia provided around 30% of the world’s exported wheat and barley, 20% of its corn, and over 50% of its sunflower oil, the

U.N. has said.

In a post on the Telegram social network on Saturday, Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko said more than 3,000 specialist­s for a local utility continued to work “around the clock” and had succeeded in restoring heat to more than more than 90% of residentia­l buildings. While about onequarter of Kyiv residents remained without electricit­y, he said water serviced had been returned to all in the city. are raised in church or in synagogue or wherever they choose to worship, their elders are Cherokee elders,” he said. “And this idea of relationsh­ip and respect and guardiansh­ip — with the land, with the Earth, with all those things that reside on it — it’s passed down. It still pervades our identity as Cherokee people.”

That’s why he believes the bison’s return to Cherokee lands is so important.

“The bison aren’t just meat,” he said. “They represent abundance and health and strength.”

 ?? ?? Ryan Mackey speaks about his spiritual connection to bison while visiting the herd in Bull Hollow, Okla. ‘We don’t speak the same language as the bison, But when you sit with them and spend time with them, relationsh­ips can be built on other means than just language alone: sharing experience­s, sharing that same space and just having a feeling of respect. Your body language changes when you have respect for someone or something,’ he says.
Ryan Mackey speaks about his spiritual connection to bison while visiting the herd in Bull Hollow, Okla. ‘We don’t speak the same language as the bison, But when you sit with them and spend time with them, relationsh­ips can be built on other means than just language alone: sharing experience­s, sharing that same space and just having a feeling of respect. Your body language changes when you have respect for someone or something,’ he says.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from United States