Miami Herald

$15 wage becoming a norm as employers struggle to fill jobs

- BY CHRISTOPHE­R RUGABER

The signs and banners are dotted along suburban commercial strips and hanging in shop windows and restaurant­s, evidence of a new desperatio­n among America’s serviceind­ustry employers: “Now Hiring, $15 an hour.”

It is hardly the official federal minimum wage — at $7.25, that level hasn’t been raised since 2009 — but for many lower-skilled workers, $15 an hour has increasing­ly become a reality.

Businesses, particular­ly in the restaurant, retail and travel industries, have been offering a $15 wage to try to fill enough jobs to meet surging demand from consumers, millions of whom are now spending freely after a year in lockdown.

And many of the unemployed, buoyed by stimulus checks and expanded jobless aid, feel able to hold out for higher pay.

The change since the pandemic has been swift. For years, and notably in the 2020 presidenti­al race, labor advocates had trumpeted $15 an hour as a wage that would finally allow low-paid workers to afford basic necessitie­s and narrow inequality. It struck many as a long-term goal.

Now, many staffing companies say $15 an hour is the level that many businesses must pay to fill their jobs.

“That number is not a coincidenc­e,” said Aaron Sojourner, an economist at the University of Minnesota. “It’s the number that those activists and workers put on the table 10 years ago, and built a movement towards.”

Even so, millions of

Americans are still earning less than $15 an hour. The nonpartisa­n Congressio­nal Budget Office calculates that even by 2025, roughly 17 million workers will remain below that level.

Yet at ZipRecruit­er, the number of job postings on the site that are advertisin­g $15 an hour has more than doubled since 2019, said Julia Pollak, labor economist for the company. The proportion of jobs that offer 401(k) retirement accounts, flexible scheduling, signing bonuses and other benefits has risen, too.

Steven Dyme, the owner of Flowers for Dreams, said the $15 minimum made it much easier for him to staff up once the economy reopened this spring and demand for flowers, particular­ly for weddings, soared.

Dyme, whose company has four locations — one in Chicago, one in Milwaukee and two in Detroit — says he’s fully staffed, with 80 full- and part-time workers. At $15 an hour, he said, “I saw a markedly different picture in how fast we could recruit and in the experience level of workers.”

Mathieu Stevenson, the CEO of Snagajob, a site for hourly workers, says a handful of restaurant chains are going so far as to offer retirement plans — he calls it the “white collarizat­ion” of blue collar jobs — as benefits once reserved for profession­als are being offered to some service workers.

“The $15 an hour debate,” Stevenson said, “is essentiall­y being resolved through market forces.”

Yet other trends have also helped drive the movement toward a $15 wage. The Fight for $15 labor movement has organized strikes by fast food workers and has lobbied states and cities for higher minimum wages. Thirty states and the District of Columbia have adopted wage floors that exceed the $7.25 federal minimum. Eleven states have passed laws that will lift their minimum wages to $15 over time. Among them is Florida, where voters last year approved a measure raising the minimum to $15 by 2026.

Other states on track to a $15 an hour wage floor include California, Illinois, New York and Virginia. Ben Zipperer, an economist at the liberal Economic Policy Institute, estimates that four in 10 workers live in states where the minimum is set to reach $15 in the coming years.

The National Employment Law Project, an advocacy group for low-income workers, calculates that 26 million people, or about 16% of workers, have received higher pay because of all the state and local minimum wage increases since 2012, though often to less than $15 an hour.

The increases have disproport­ionately benefited Black and Hispanic workers, the report found. Historical­ly, higher minimum wages have been found to reduce racial wage gaps.

Many employers are having to pay more to keep up with larger companies, including Amazon, Costco and Target, that have announced their own pay raises to $15 or more. More recently, Under Armour, Southwest Airlines and Best Buy have adopted $15 wage floors.

Economic research has found that when a large company raises pay, nearby employers feel compelled to follow suit. A study led by Ellora Derenoncou­rt, a Princeton University economist, found that companies in local markets that compete with Amazon, Target or Walmart generally responded by matching their wage hikes dollar-for-dollar.

Derenoncou­rt’s research also found that when companies seek to match the pay offered by their large competitor­s, they often end up employing fewer people, though the impact is relatively small.

 ?? CHARLES REX ARBOGAST AP ?? Steven Dyme, owner of Flowers for Dreams, at his warehouse Friday in Chicago. Dyme says the $15 minimum made it much easier to staff up when the economy reopened this spring and demand for flowers, particular­ly for weddings, soared.
CHARLES REX ARBOGAST AP Steven Dyme, owner of Flowers for Dreams, at his warehouse Friday in Chicago. Dyme says the $15 minimum made it much easier to staff up when the economy reopened this spring and demand for flowers, particular­ly for weddings, soared.

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