// GAR­DENS OF EDEN

WITH LUSH NEW TOME MOVE­MENT AND MEAN­ING, RENOWNED CHICAGO LAND­SCAPE AR­CHI­TEC­TURE FIRM HO­ERR SCHAUDT KICKS OFF SUM­MER IN VER­DANT STYLE.

Michigan Avenue - - CONTENTS - BY STEPHEN OSTROWSKI

With lush new tome Move­ment and Mean­ing, renowned land­scape firm Ho­err Schaudt kicks off sum­mer in ver­dant style.

When Dou­glas Ho­err ar­rived in Chicago in 1991 fol­low­ing a two-year ap­pren­tice­ship in the leafy gar­dens of Eng­land, the land­scape ar­chi­tect was un­der­whelmed. “It was good, thought­ful land­scape ar­chi­tec­ture,” re­calls the In­di­ana na­tive, “but it was more fo­cused on hard­scapes and plazas; hor­ti­cul­ture was by and large per­func­tory.” Since then— first as a solo prac­ti­tioner and later part­ner­ing with the late Peter Schaudt to form pow­er­house firm Ho­err Schaudt in 2008—the 60year-old Lincoln Park res­i­dent has beau­ti­fied en­vi­rons rang­ing from the Mag Mile’s famed flower me­di­ans to Grant Park’s Tif­fany Cel­e­bra­tion Gar­den.

As Ho­err cel­e­brates the re­cent pub­li­ca­tion of Move­ment and Mean­ing (The Mona­celli Press, $50), a stun­ning new ret­ro­spec­tive doc­u­ment­ing the global im­print of the duo’s renowned green thumb, he shares his thoughts on some of the firm’s most suc­cess­ful projects in Chicago and be­yond.

Beau­ti­fi­ca­tion break­through: Com­mis­sioned in 1991, Ho­err’s ver­dant planters out­side Crate & Bar­rel’s Michi­gan Av­enue flag­ship did much more than just gussy up the Mag Mile; the project “had a huge im­pact on Chicago, to a de­gree, [of] re­brand­ing a city that was al­ways known for tough­ness,” he ob­serves, adding, “It was hold­ing its own and say­ing, ‘Look what it does when ar­chi­tec­ture and land­scape work in har­mony to­gether.’”

Hor­ti­cul­ture 101: From the 40,000-square-foot green roof gar­den of Toronto’s Phillips Square to the Mcgovern Centennial Gar­dens in Hous­ton’s Her­mann Park, Ho­err Schaudt’s reach is in­ter­na­tional—but in­formed by cir­cum­stances

spe­cific to the Mid­west. “The truest test of good de­sign is how it looks in the win­ter,” ob­serves Ho­err. “That’s a les­son that has worked for me in dif­fer­ent parts of the coun­try, even though there’s not al­ways the four sea­sons.”

El­e­vated ecol­ogy: In 2003, Ap­ple be­came the first pri­vate sec­tor com­pany in Chicago with a green rooftop after tap­ping Ho­err to de­sign its Michi­gan Av­enue space—but only after the firm con­vinced the late Steve Jobs of its im­por­tance. “[I told him], ‘if a guy like you, Steve, who’s the ar­chi­tect of the 21st cen­tury, doesn’t lead by ex­am­ple en­vi­ron­men­tally and de­sign­wise, then what hope do we have?’” Ap­ple later com­mis­sioned Ho­err Schaudt for its Lincoln Park out­post in 2010.

Grid­iron green­ing: Ho­err sin­gles out Peter Schaudt’s beautifying of Sol­dier Field as a fa­vorite project by his one-time “friendly com­peti­tor,” whose 2003 re­design of the sta­dium’s perime­ter in­cludes a ver­dant Chil­dren’s Park and 17 acres of lake­front green­ery. “It showed [the im­por­tance of] wor­ry­ing about the aes­thet­ics—not just the ar­chi­tec­tural aes­thet­ics, but the con­text of the greater site—so it’s not just acres of park­ing lot,” com­mends Ho­err.

The fu­ture of land­scape: From ameni­tized rooftops to fleshed-out river­banks, Ho­err fore­casts a grow­ing em­brace of pre­vi­ously over­looked spa­ces and “ac­tu­ally sink­ing your teeth into ar­eas that at one time weren’t even con­sid­ered im­por­tant.”

The Tif­fany Cel­e­bra­tion dar­den in drant Park pic­turesquely frames the grand Buck­ing­ham coun­tain.

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