choco­late truf­fles

Midwest Living - - He & No Master Class -

MIX-INS

FINELY CHOPPED TOASTED NUTS MINCED DRIED FRUIT OR CRYS­TAL­LIZED GINGER LIQUEUR, SUCH AS KAHLÚA (1 TA­BLE­SPOON) EX­TRACT, SUCH AS PEP­PER­MINT (1∕4 TO 1∕2 TEA­SPOON) SPICES, SUCH AS CAYENNE, CIN­NA­MON OR SEA SALT

COAT­INGS

CO­COA POW­DER COARSE DEC­O­RAT­ING SUG­ARS SPRIN­KLES FINELY CHOPPED TOASTED NUTS FREEZE-DRIED RASP­BER­RIES, BLITZED TO A RED POW­DER IN THE FOOD PRO­CES­SOR

MELT

Chop choco­late (for quan­tity, see note below). Set aside. Heat 1∕2 cup heavy whip­ping cream in a dou­ble boiler or heavy saucepan over medium heat, stir­ring oc­ca­sion­ally, un­til steam­ing (do not boil). Add choco­late; stir to coat, then re­move from heat. Let stand, cov­ered, for 5 min­utes. Stir

un­til com­bined, scrap­ing sides. If nec­es­sary, briefly re­turn to low heat to melt fully. Add a mix-in, if de­sired. Line a rimmed bak­ing sheet with parch­ment pa­per. Spread mix­ture evenly on pa­per.

SET

Let mix­ture stand for

2 hours to set, then chill at least 2 more hours in the fridge. Us­ing a 1-inch scoop or 2 tea­spoons, di­vide mix­ture into 1-inch pieces. Place on a bak­ing sheet lined with parch­ment pa­per. If nec­es­sary, chill 10 to 15 min­utes, un­til just firm.

FIN­ISH

Roll each piece be­tween your palms un­til round, smooth and a bit tacky, but not gooey. Toss each ball im­me­di­ately in coat­ing of your choice. HOW MUCH CHOCO­LATE? You can use bit­ter­sweet, milk or white choco­late—but the amount varies be­cause each melts to a dif­fer­ent con­sis­tency. For every 1∕2 cup cream, use 150 grams bit­ter­sweet choco­late (yield: about 16 truf­fles), 300 grams milk choco­late (yield: 26) or 410 grams white choco­late (yield: 32). For shop­ping ref­er­ence: Good-qual­ity bars such as Lindt or Ghi­rardelli weigh about 100 grams, but an in­ex­pen­sive dig­i­tal scale makes pre­cise mea­sur­ing a breeze.

“Buy the nices­t­look­ing bars at the store,” Pete says. “Look for some­thing with­out ar­ti­fi­cial fla­vors or fillers like veg­etable oil.” “Some­times the mix­ture will break and the fat starts to sep­a­rate,” Pete warns. But not to fear: “If it looks lumpy or oily, an im­mer­sion blender quickly and eas­ily makes it re­ally smooth again. A whisk works, too.” The mix­ture shouldn’t be rock-hard, but you’ll be rolling it with your hands, so you want it firm enough to avoid melt­ing. Truf­fles coated with freeze-dried rasp­ber­ries taste and look best the first day. Other coat­ings will hold fine for a few days. Store truf­fles at a cool, dry room temp.

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