PIECRUST

AT A LIT­TLE MICHI­GAN BAK­ERY, WE FOUND CRUMB-TOPPED CRAN­BER­RIES, SUNNY-SIDE UP TARTS, TOASTY MERINGUE—AND THE SE­CRET TO MAK­ING BUT­TERY, FLAKY, UT­TERLY UN­FOR­GET­TABLE PIE DOUGH FROM SCRATCH.

Midwest Living - - Contents - WRITER Han­nah Agran PHO­TOG­RA­PHERS Blaine Moats and EE Berger

No one frets over slic­ing ap­ples for a pie. It’s the pas­try that in­tim­i­dates.

Lisa Lud­win­ski sees the fear when she hosts classes at her Detroit bak­ery, Sis­ter Pie. “The ter­ror re­ally awak­ens when it’s roll-out time,” she writes in her new cook­book, Sis­ter Pie (Lorena Jones Books, $25). But Lisa has a tip that’s as lib­er­at­ing as it is sim­ple: Em­brace fail­ure. Your first at­tempt will al­most cer­tainly be patchy, lumpy, cracked—a truly hum­ble pie. But it will taste bet­ter than any­thing you buy rolled in a box. Forge ahead. “It’s only through spend­ing an af­ter­noon in your kitchen with a cou­ple of pounds of but­ter, mak­ing this recipe over and over again, that you’ll be­gin to de­velop the nec­es­sary in­tu­ition for crust-mak­ing suc­cess,” Lisa says. Bake again next week­end. And again. Take your­self to pie school. (Your friends and fam­ily are go­ing to love you.) With all that de­li­cious prac­tice, you’ll hone a skill that will un­lock a whole world of good­ies, not just pies, but quiche, cook­ies and even crack­ers. So be brave! Thanks­giv­ing is around the cor­ner, and Lisa’s tan­ta­liz­ing recipes await.

ABOVE LISA LUD­WIN­SKI OPENED SIS­TER PIE IN DETROIT’S WEST VIL­LAGE IN 2015. TOP EVERY DAY, THE CREW MAKES PAS­TRY BY HAND, ONE QUADRU­PLE BATCH AT A TIME. FILL­INGS FEA­TURE SEA­SONAL IN­GRE­DI­ENTS, OF­TEN PUR­CHASED FROM FARM­ERS AT EAST­ERN MAR­KET.

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