Modern Healthcare : 2019-02-11

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SPONSORED CONTENT Meanwhile, 46 percent of respondents believe payers and providers can collaborate to improve quality, and 45 percent believe collaboration around care management is an opportunity that should be explored. “As we open the aperture around value a little more, we’re starting to see greater emphasis on experiments in improving quality of care that are beginning to make a significant impact,” Johnson says. Alignment Opportunity No. 3: Driving consumer engagement. Sixty-one percent of payers and providers believe they are neither "somewhat prepared" or "totally prepared" to boost consumer engagement for improved performance under value-based payment models. About one out of five senior leaders who responded to the survey (22 percent) rated their level of preparedness as a “2” on a five-point scale in which “1” represents “unprepared” and “5” represents “totally prepared.” This compares to 21 percent of clinical leaders who responded to the survey, 18 percent of healthcare finance leaders, and 14 percent of operations leaders. 1 2% 2 16% 3 36% 4 35% 5 11% Additionally, 40 percent of clinical leaders cited consumer engagement as an area where they are looking to spur innovation within their organization. This compares to 33 percent of senior leaders and 27 percent of operations leaders. Total Answering: 367 Respondents. “As we open the aperture around value a little more, we’re starting to see greater emphasis on experiments in improving quality of care that are beginning to make a significant impact.” With consumers’ out-of-pocket costs for care reaching record levels2, “that’s putting pressure on payers and providers to give consumers the tools they need to make smarter decisions about care,” Johnson says. Alignment Opportunity No. 4: Enabling technologies for value-based care. Fifty-four percent of healthcare professionals surveyed believe their organization is at a 1, 2 or 3 on our five-point scale as it relates to leveraging technologies in their value-based care strategies, meaning that they are neither “somewhat prepared” nor “totally prepared”. Fifty-three percent of senior executives who responded to the survey identified their organization in this group, compared to 54 percent of operations leaders, 58 percent of clinical leaders and 67 percent of healthcare finance leaders. At the heart of this challenge is the need for actionable data—not just to pinpoint where gaps in care exist, but also to determine which populations would most benefit from collaborative efforts to improve health. “You almost can’t overinvest in data analytics in the transition to value-based care — as long as you match that investment with the people and creativity needed to look for new answers in new places in the data,” Johnson says. 4

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