A.M. COF­FEE, A.M. WORK­OUT

Natural Solutions - - Healthmatters Food -

Think­ing of switch­ing your work­outs to the early hours? Your usual cup of cof­fee might help you stick to it—and see more ben­e­fits. Ac­cord­ing to a new study, those ath­letes who, prior to ex­er­cise, con­sumed a mod­er­ately high dose of caf­feine (for a 150-pound woman, that’s 300 mg—about the amount in a 12-ounce cup of cof­fee) burned about 15 per­cent more calo­ries for three hours post-work­out, com­pared with those who were given a placebo. Source: In­ter­na­tional Jour­nal of Sport Nu­tri­tion and Ex­er­cise Me­tab­o­lism

The per­cent­age of Amer­i­cans who report that their will­ing­ness to be­lieve new in­for­ma­tion about food and health is at least some­what im­pacted by their own re­search Source: In­ter­na­tional Food In­for­ma­tion Coun­cil Foun­da­tion

8 EX­CEP­TIONAL WHOLE GRAINS YOU ARE N ’ T EATING Black Rice | Kaniwa | Sorghum | Teff | Buck­wheat | Mil­let | Rye | Bar­ley

Mind Your La­bels Many of us read food la­bels prior to pur­chas­ing—and we look for brands that we as­so­ci­ate with “health­ful” eating. But a re­cent study found that women ate more cook­ies of a health­ful brand (Kashi, 130 calo­ries per cookie) than a less health­ful brand (Nabisco, 260 calo­ries per cookie). Although nu­tri­tional con­tent varies from brand to brand, be mind­ful of la­bels that might give you li­cense to overeat. Source: Ap­petite THE PER­CENT­AGE BY WHICH THE RISK OF DY­ING FROM HEART DIS­EASE GOES DOWN WITH EACH AV­ER­AGE DAILY SERV­ING OF

WHOLE GRAINS SOURCE: HAR­VARD SCHOOL OF PUB­LIC

HEALTH

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