New York Magazine

The New Shul’s Rosh Hashanah Ser­vice

- The New Shul, a “pro­gres­sive, in­clu­sive, in­de­pen­dent, and egal­i­tar­ian” con­gre­ga­tion led by Rabbi Misha Shul­man, ob­served the High Hol­i­days un­der a tent at the Queens County Farm. in­ter­views by jane starr drinkard and brock col­yar

CEO, East Vil­lage

Mu­si­cian, Clin­ton Hill

Have you known Rabbi Misha long? He’s brand new; this was his first ser­vice. He was calm and kind, and it was a nour­ish­ing ex­pe­ri­ence to be with him and his mu­si­cians.

Clin­i­cal psy­chol­o­gist, Guil­ford, Con­necti­cut

Mu­si­cian, Prospect–Lef­ferts Gar­dens

Artist, Car­roll Gar­dens

Bike valet and Cen­sus-taker, Bed-Stuy

What was the best part of the evening?

I will start with the cake. I of course love the com­mu­nity, but some­one brought a cake—it was a saf­fron-olive cake with pine nuts. It was the highlight of my ser­vice.

Artist and de­signer, West Vil­lage

Film­maker and yoga in­struc­tor, Dumbo

Ar­chi­tect, Long Is­land City

Is the New

Shul your nor­mal sy­n­a­gogue? Usu­ally, we go to a tem­ple near our apart­ment in Chelsea, but I heard about this and knew my daugh­ter and I had to go. I’m a sin­gle par­ent, out of work, and we don’t have a car, so we had to take the train and the bus and the LIRR to get here. It was worth it: It was a golden, golden evening.

Mas­sage ther­a­pist, Chelsea

Stu­dent, Car­roll Gar­dens

Ed­i­tor, Crown Heights

The city’s Open Restau­rants ini­tia­tive has been ex­tended per­ma­nently and year-round. Here’s how to make the most of it. del­i­cately tangy mix of sea­weed, uni, and salmon eggs ap­peared af­ter that, fol­lowed by a se­lec­tion of sashimi (maguro, mack­erel, and sweet scal­lops fin­ished with yuzu) el­e­gantly laid out, just like old times, on a block of black slate. The seven-piece ni­giri se­lec­tion was pro­fes­sion­ally done and even a rel­a­tive bar­gain for the price, al­though if you en­joy con­sum­ing your omakase din­ner in si­lent con­tem­pla­tion, book a ta­ble for later in the evening, when the rush­hour traf­fic has thinned and there aren’t so many po­lice chop­pers hov­er­ing over­head.

There weren’t any chop­pers in the sky above (17 W. 20th St., nr. Fifth Ave.) when I sat down to din­ner at one of the wooden ta­bles that had been set up on the side­walk un­der a canopy of cof­fee-col­ored para­sols. The chef, Hiroki Odo, had “piv­oted” away from the set-course ex­pe­ri­ence, our server ex­plained, but we were free to cre­ate our own omakase, which be­gan with a va­ri­ety of top-grade sashimi served on two round wooden trays. There were skew­ers of per­fectly fried soft-shell crab af­ter that (“No one deep-fries like this at home,” my guest in­toned) and a se­lec­tion of uni from the fa­mous sea-urchin re­gions of Japan (Hokkaido, Miyagi), which caused my guest to close his eyes in a rap­tur­ous way, like a tee­to­taler tast­ing his first mar­tini in a long time. As the sun set over the empty street and more dishes ar­rived (tra­di­tional oni­giri toasted over the char­coal grill, more skew­ers, a help­ing of late-sum­mer-corn por­ridge dressed with bits of un­agi), we agreed that the open-air omakase had its charms, and it would prob­a­bly be a long time be­fore we ever set foot in a stuffy, cramped, in­door omakase room again.

 ??  ?? SUZANNE TICK
SUZANNE TICK
 ??  ?? AMY GOLDFARB
AMY GOLDFARB
 ??  ?? TRIPP DUD­LEY
TRIPP DUD­LEY
 ??  ?? JU­LIA GOR­DON
JU­LIA GOR­DON
 ??  ?? IS­ABELLE AP­PLE­TON
IS­ABELLE AP­PLE­TON
 ??  ?? GHIORA AHARONI
GHIORA AHARONI
 ??  ?? MAIA WECHSLER
MAIA WECHSLER
 ??  ?? JOHN MURCHI­SON
JOHN MURCHI­SON
 ??  ?? AMIE GROSS
AMIE GROSS
 ??  ?? DANIEL REINISCH
DANIEL REINISCH
 ??  ?? ELI GOR­DON
ELI GOR­DON
 ??  ?? RACHEL WE­IN­STEIN
RACHEL WE­IN­STEIN
 ??  ??

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