New York Post

Don’s out for blood on O’Care

But Mitch says move on

- By MARK MOORE

Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell says he’s ready to “move on” from repealing ObamaCare — but President Trump has other plans.

“Based on the fact that the very unfair and unpopular Individual Mandate has been terminated as part of our Tax Cut Bill, which essentiall­y Repeals (over time) ObamaCare, the Democrats & Republican­s will eventually come together and develop a great new HealthCare plan!” Trump tweeted Tuesday morning.

The GOP’s $1.5 trillion tax overhaul signed into law by Trump last week dealt a potentiall­y fatal blow to the Affordable Care Act by doing away with the individual mandate, which requires people to have medical insurance or pay a penalty.

The nonpartisa­n Congressio­nal Budget Office said the end of the individual mandate will result in an estimated 13 million Americans losing health insurance by 2027.

McConnell, however, after repeatedly failing to repeal and replace the Obama-era health plan, said last week it was time to address other issues.

“Well, we obviously were unable to completely repeal and replace with a 52-48 Senate,” McConnell told NPR, referring to the GOP’s advantage in the Senate. “We’ll have to take a look at what that looks like with a 51-49 Senate. But I think we’ll probably move on to other issues.”

Republican­s will see their majority shrink in January once Democrat Doug Jones, who won the Alabama special election, is seated.

With tax reform out of the way, Republican­s are already looking at a full legislativ­e agenda for 2018 that includes infrastruc­ture spending, immigratio­n reform and reducing entitlemen­ts.

At a Cabinet meeting last week, Trump sounded the death knell of ObamaCare.

“When the individual mandate is being repealed that means ObamaCare is being repealed,” he said. “We have essentiall­y repealed ObamaCare, and we will come up with something much better.”

But recent sign-ups show the health-care plan may not be done yet. Despite Republican efforts to repeal it and the Trump administra­tion’s slashing the budget advertisin­g the plan, enrollment hit 8.8 million this year during the period between Nov. 1 and Dec. 15 — just short of the 9.2 million Americans who signed up in 2016.

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