EASY CANDY, BIG RE­WARD

Choco­late truf­fles

Orlando Sentinel - - COOKING & EATING -

PREP SCHOOL

As for the cream, the thing you want to pay at­ten­tion to is ra­tios. Ganache comes in dif­fer­ent thick­nesses, like lenses at the op­tometrist. For truf­fles, you want a fairly stiff ganache, roughly a 2 to 1 ra­tio of choco­late to cream. If you’re fla­vor­ing your truf­fles, fig­ure about an ounce of booze or a tea­spoon of ex­tract per cup of cream.

To make ganache, bring your cream to a sim­mer in a small saucepan. While it heats, turn your choco­late bar into lit­tle shards: Us­ing a ser­rated knife, such as a bread knife, shave off thin slices and the choco­late will crum­ble into bits like a des­ic­cated mummy — just what you want. When you’ve got enough, give the choco­latey pile a few more chops to re­duce the size of the pieces even fur­ther. Do this part with a chef ’s knife, as you can rock its curved blade over the choco­late like you’re minc­ing gar­lic.

Next, grab a metal mix­ing bowl. Make sure it’s dry as a lu­nar plain, be­cause water can make melt­ing choco­late seize up like an oil-starved V-6. Put your choco­late into the bowl and dump in the hot cream, let­ting it sit for sev­eral sec­onds to start the choco­late melt­ing.

To com­bine the cream and choco­late, don’t use a whisk; use a rub­ber spat­ula. Stir in small cir­cles from the in­side out, work­ing the choco­late into the cream to form a smooth and silky pond of de­light. This is ganache.

Here’s a thing: It’s pos­si­ble the di­min­ish­ing heat from your cool­ing cream will not be enough to com­plete the melti­fi­ca­tion proc

E. JA­SON WAMBSGANS/ CHICAGO TRI­BUNE; SHAN­NON KINSELLA/ FOOD STYLING

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