HOW TO STAY WARM WHEN WA­TER­FOWL­ING

Outdoor Life - - HUNTING -

JEREMY DER­SHAM’S Ridge and River Run­ning Out­fit­ting (face­book. com/ridge-and-river-run­ning-out-fit­ters-1399290860­59914/) is one of only five com­mer­cial op­er­a­tions on Pool 9 of the up­per Mis­sis­sippi River. Late-sea­son wa­ter­fowl hunts can bring some of the best wa­ter­fowl flights of the sea­son, but the cold weather also comes with unique chal­lenges. Here are three things Der­sham says are es­sen­tial for all late­sea­son hunters.

sand: Sev­eral hun­dred pounds of sand (and salt) stored in the pickup bed helps pro­vide sta­bil­ity on snow-cov­ered or icy roads, but even more im­por­tant, on boat ramps. Check the ramp care­fully be­fore back­ing down, and sand when needed. Your duck boat may stop your slide into the lake or river, but not be­fore you jack­knife. The deck of the ramp clos­est to the wa­ter will be the ici­est.

an ax, and a hatchet: Frozen wa­ter is the bane of ev­ery duck hunter’s ex­is­tence. “If you hunt late in the sea­son, chances are you’ll need to bust your way into or out of the wa­ter,” says Der­sham. “I take along both a hatchet and long-han­dled ax.”

ther­mos With hot liq­uid: Whether you use it to warm your­self or thaw the pee-hole on your out­board, hot liq­uids in large quan­ti­ties are a must. They can save the day—or your life. Der­sham brings along sev­eral large ther­moses each day.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.