TOP STATES FOR COW ELK

Outdoor Life - - HUNTING -

Mon­tana

Non­res­i­dents must first en­ter a draw­ing for a deer and elk com­bi­na­tion li­cense, which is $1,045 and al­lows you to hunt gen­eral en­try units. Once you draw that, you can then re­search and ap­ply for cow tags in lim­ited-en­try units.

Utah

Draw suc­cess for lim­it­e­den­try bulls is no­to­ri­ously dif­fi­cult in the Bee­hive State; the odds are 1-in-60 for non­res­i­dents. Antler­less tags are a dif­fer­ent story. The odds are 1-in-2.9 for non­res­i­dents ap­ply­ing for cow tags.

Colorado

Colorado doesn’t is­sue quite as many antler­less elk tags as it once did, but it’s still a bar­gain. Non­res­i­dent youth cow tags are sold for $100, and in many units, bull hunters are al­lowed to pick up a sec­ond tag for cows.

Idaho

The Gem State of­fers over­the-counter cow tags for archery, muz­zleloader, and ri­fle sea­sons—plus mil­lions of acres of pub­lic land open to elk hunt­ing. The cost is $582, and the suc­cess rate on antler­less elk is very good.

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