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Krakow Deli Bakery & Smokehouse sends large shipment of aid for Ukraine

- By JOSEPH B. NADEAU jnadeau@woonsocket­call.com

WOONSOCKET – er, The took 10 Krakow

Deli Bakery & Smokehouse’s volun

teers put together another five pallets of needed relief goods for Two Ukrainian

refugees at the 855 Social St. business

Tuesday afternoon and

business’ owners feeling thankful over

the area’s response to their won the humanitari­an aid effort.

“I feel just overwhelme­d by all the support we have received,” Krakow owner Krystian Przybylko said while he and his wife, Agata, worked with a half dozen volunteers to get the shipment of supplies ready for pick-up on Wednesday.

“I’m very humbled that people trust us that they can come and drop off the items here and have them put on pallets by our volunteers and sent out,” Przybe owner first “Without extremely base two added. out the hard volunteers to do,” the it business would Krakow Deli has been collecting items for Ukrainian refugees since Poland’s sent neighbor anothwas invaded by Russian President Vladimir Putin’s forces more with five than RBIs. two months ago and will have sent out 28 pallets of goods with those the Rangers assembled but on Tuesday. “There’s a row this over 2.5 million refugees in Poland right now and their needs are See only SOX, getting page B6 greater every day unfortunat­ely,” Przybylko said. “We’ve become more and more muted to it, so I believe there is more and more help needed than ever,” the local business owner added. Krakow held a fundraiser for Ukraine on May 1 which featured a brunch of pierogis made with potatoes and farmer’s cheese that followed two earlier weekend meal fundraiser­s to benefit its relief work.

In addition to shipping needed personal care items and clothing to Poland for the refugees, Przybylko has also created a new non-profit, Bread for Freedom, that will help provide a basic food staple to the refugees being assisted in Krakow. A website breadforfr­eedom.org has also been set up to receive donations for the food support initiative.

“That is where we are from, that’s where we know the bakeries and that’s where the bakery organizati­ons are that are helping Ukrainian refugees in Krakow,” Przybylko explained.

Krakow Deli’s work for Ukrainians began because Przybylko and his family felt a need to give back.

“We are blessed to live in the

United States, in Woonsocket, we have a great community where the response has been just incredible, to tell you the truth people are looking for a way help,” Przybylko said.

“I’ve been getting tons of messages from people looking for a way to help,” Przybylko added.

After the first event, a breakfast, the effort just grew and became much bigger than Przybylko ever expected.

“The response has been just tremendous,” Przybylko said of the local interest in helping Ukrainian refugees.

“We do two things, we’ve been collecting items, personal hygiene products, women and children’s clothing, diapers, flip flops, over the counter medicine, we’ve been collecting those items for two months now,” Przybylko said.

Since that part of Krakow Deli’s assistance work began, Przybylko has been able to fill pallets, 4 by 4 by 7, with goods to help the refugees.

Some of the items are to used by the refugees now in Poland and some will go on to Ukraine where possible.

Przybylko said the local the fundraisin­g efforts have helped send $6,623 to the Gajusz Foundation that helps Ukrainian children in hospice care. Krakow Deli also sent $4,000 of its donations to another organizati­on that helps to feed Ukrainian refugees arriving at Krakow’s train station.

The new Bread for Freedom non-profit set up by Przybylko seeks to take the local support a step further by connecting funds raised here with bakery operations in Krakow that can in turn provide a basic food staple to the Ukrainian refugees.

“I am just finishing up an agreement with a bakery in Krakow Poland,” Przybylko said of the bread project. A loaf of bread in Poland will cost a $1 and will help a family for a least a couple of days, Przybylko explained.

“They provide bread to about five different small groups that either house or feed Ukrainian refugees and we are going to be sending them money so they will give the bread free to the organizati­ons,” Przybylko said.

With the war still going on in Ukraine, it seems that the early strong support for those fleeing the invasion could fade somewhat, according to Przybylko, even though the need hasn’t.

“I’m hoping I’m very wrong, I wish I am very wrong, but I think the problem with this, even with this food—it’s only going to get worse and worse in Poland for those refugees,” Przybylko said.

The Polish people, “helped tremendous­ly,” with tons of clothing and tons of food at the beginning, but Poland, while doing OK, “it’s not the richest country in the world,” Przybylko said.

“They are still helping as much as they can but a couple of weeks ago there were already shortages of food,” the local business owner said.

“The people who feed the Ukrainian refugees, at first they had so much, they had too much food, they didn’t know what to do with it, because the outpouring of help was so big,” Przybylko said.

“But people have to live their lives, they have their families, they cannot help forever,” Przybylko added.

“So that’s why we wanted to help that’s why we created that non-profit,” Przybylko said.

“I would like to help as long we can, as long as people respond and want to help,” Przybylko said. The needs are only getting bigger day by day because the cost of flour is skyrocketi­ng three times more than it was just a few months ago,” Przybylko said.

Bread is more than a staple, it is a spiritual way to sustain life, according to Przybylko.

“Bread is very sacred for us, for Polish people, for Ukrainian people,” Przybylko said.

As a baker, himself, Przybylko said he knows Bread for Freedom can make a difference.

“We would love to buy all those refugee filet mignon everyday but at least if we can buy them bread that would be a minimum ensuring nobody would go hungry,” Przybylko said.

The boxes of goods being palleted and wrapped with shrink wrap were to be picked up by the Polonez Parcel Service during the day on Wednesday for shipping to Poland, Przybylko said.

The actual distributi­on of the humanitari­an aid would be handled by Caritas, an internatio­nal Catholic relief organizati­on.

“We are sending the most needed items to Krakow, Poland, and some of it will actually go to Ukraine too,” Przybylko said on Tuesday.

“This the least that we can do, and I’m sure it will help,” Przybylko said.

More informatio­n on Krakow Deli’s charitable work can be found on its Facebook page or at the new website for Bread for Freedom.

 ?? Photo by Joseph B. Nadeau ?? Kristian Przybylko, Michelle DeSerres of Burrillvil­le, Madeleine Riendeau of Woonsocket, Julie Tetreault of Blackstone and Bob
MLB
Dawkins of Burrillvil­le help pack boxes of supplies to be sent as aid packages to Ukraine.
Photo by Joseph B. Nadeau Kristian Przybylko, Michelle DeSerres of Burrillvil­le, Madeleine Riendeau of Woonsocket, Julie Tetreault of Blackstone and Bob MLB Dawkins of Burrillvil­le help pack boxes of supplies to be sent as aid packages to Ukraine.
 ?? ?? Kristian and Agata Przybylko stand near some of the Ukrainian aid boxes being prepared Tuesday for shipment to Poland from their Krakow Deli Bakery & Smokehouse
Kristian and Agata Przybylko stand near some of the Ukrainian aid boxes being prepared Tuesday for shipment to Poland from their Krakow Deli Bakery & Smokehouse

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