PCWorld (USA)

Five free Photoshop alternativ­es for Windows

Photoshop is crazy expensive. If you’re looking to save some cash while hanging on to powerful photo editing, check out these five programs.

- BY MICHAEL CRIDER

Photoshop is an absolute staple of modern graphic design, an industry standard for over 30 years. It’s also insanely expensive and no longer available as a stand-alone program. You’ll pay Adobe a minimum of $120 every year to use it as a part of a Creative Cloud subscripti­on ( fave.co/3dklt9y). That’s a lot of dough to drop, especially if you’re only using it for the occasional photo edit.

There are low-cost alternativ­es to Photoshop, like Adobe’s own Photoshop Elements ( fave.co/3e7k5qw) or Affinity Photo ( fave.co/3femwpt). But if you’re looking to get the job done without spending a dime, you have a few surprising options. For even more no-cost alternativ­es to popular software, be sure to check out our roundup of the best free software for your PC ( fave.co/3j9elfk).

A WEB-BASED PHOTOSHOP CLONE: PHOTOPEA

Photopea ( fave.co/3kcavej) is a web-based editor, available in any browser. The big

appeal here is that, in addition to being free, its interface is based directly on the tools and menus of Photoshop. Veterans of Adobe software who aren’t looking to learn an entirely new system are served especially well here.

Being web based, Photopea can’t take advantage of powerful hardware, and long-time Photoshop users will need to relearn a few keyboard shortcuts. But all things considered, it’s a remarkably effective alternativ­e. Free users get access to all of the program’s tools, but a $3 per month plan unlocks a longer history and banishes advertisem­ents.

A COMPLEX BUT POWERFUL ALTERNATIV­E: GIMP

A long-time favorite of Linux users, the GIMP image editor is now available on all platforms ( fave.co/32qlo1s). While its interface isn’t exactly friendly to beginners—especially if you’re used to other programs—it’s at least as powerful as Photoshop for standard image editing tasks.

GIMP is short for GNU Image Manipulati­on Program. GNU is short for “GNU is not Unix.” Unix is—you know what, we’re getting distracted. Just

know that GIMP is at least as flexible as Photoshop in terms of capability (albeit without some of the whiz-bang additions in Creative Cloud), so long as you’re willing to dive into a wiki or two.

FOR QUICK AND EASY EDITS: PAINT.NET

This Windows-first editing program has been in continual developmen­t for almost two decades. As the name implies, it’s a more powerful alternativ­e to the built-in Paint tool that’s still a staple of the operating system. But don’t let the name fool you: Paint.net ( fave.co/33l0k6n) is much closer to Photoshop than Paint in terms of capability.

While it lacks some of the more advanced graphic design tools in Adobe’s belt, Paint.net can handle more or less any basic editing task, with full support for layers, action history, and even complex plugins. Just be prepared for an adjustment period for its interface, which favors floating menus over docked tools.

FOR THE DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPH­ER: PHOTOSCAPE X

Photoscape X ( fave.co/3yhszzb) is definitely more of a photo editor than an image editor, with a focus on easy-to-use tools for rapidly improving photos and adding social media– approved extras. It’s particular­ly handy if what you’re editing is portraits and other peoplefocu­sed photograph­y.

Even so, it includes a few surprising tools, like a batch editor and a GIF creator. Photoscape X is a great choice for someone who wants something like Photoshop but doesn’t have years of experience to unlearn. The standard version is free, while the pro version with better text handling and more powerful filters is a reasonable $40.

FOR THE DIGITAL ARTIST: KRITA

In contrast to Photoscape, Krita ( fave. co/3ebvare) is for users who need a tool for direct art creation: digital drawing, painting, inking, et cetera. Its interface and tools are tailored to artists first and foremost, and its rasterbase­d image editing capabiliti­es aren’t all that impressive.

Krita’s layout should be familiar to Photoshop users, and its wide array of brush settings and vector tools should allow flexibilit­y for artists who like to mix media. It even has some basic 2D animation tools. The editing program itself is free, with community developmen­t supported by add-ons and tutorials available in its online shop.

 ?? ??
 ?? ?? GIMP.
GIMP.
 ?? ?? Photopea.
Photopea.
 ?? ?? Paint.net.
Paint.net.
 ?? ?? Photoscape X.
Photoscape X.
 ?? ?? Krita.
Krita.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from United States