A list of books to beat the win­ter dol­drums and more.

WE KNOW, WE KNOW—IT’S USU­ALLY A SUM­MER THING. BUT THERE’S A BOOK HERE FOR EV­ERY­BODY, SO CURL UP WITH ONE OF THESE TITLES.

Power & Motor Yacht - - CONTENTS - EDITED BY SI­MON MUR­RAY

1. THE SURVIVAL STORY: Al­most a decade be­fore writ­ing TheFinest Hours, Michael Tougias wrote about a Coast Guard res­cue dur­ing the in­fa­mous bliz­zard of ’78 that hit the North­east. “It’s a story that sucks you in and makes you feel like you’re aboard the CanDo, which is a very scary place to be,” says Ed­i­tor-in-Chief Dan Harding. “I was glad to read it while tucked into the warm berth of a boat on a calm river.”

2. THE CLAS­SIC: “A strange and won­der­ful book,” says Ex­ec­u­tive Ed­i­tor Capt. Bill Pike of TheCurve­ofTime by M. Wylie Blanchet. “On the one hand Blanchet’s point of view is care­ful, prac­ti­cal. On the other, she steers her lit­tle 25-footer (and her five chil­dren) straight into the vir­tu­ally un­tram­meled wilder­ness of Bri­tish Columbia dur­ing the 1920s.”

3. THE PE­RIOD PIECE: “If you’ve never read Erik Lar­son, be warned: His prose will trans­port you to a dif­fer­ent era,” says Deputy Ed­i­tor Ja­son Wood. In Dead Wake, Lar­son tells the tale of the sink­ing of the RMS Lusi­ta­nia, which helped draw the U.S. into World War I. This is grip­ping nonfiction, where, Lar­son notes, “any­thing ap­pear­ing be­tween quotes comes from a mem­oir, let­ter, tele­gram, or other his­tor­i­cal doc­u­ment.”

4. THE ONE YOU AL­WAYS WANTED TO READ, BUT DIDN’T: In the 18th cen­tury, “the lon­gi­tude prob­lem” was a puz­zling sci­en­tific dilemma. How does one mea­sure it at sea? One man, in com­plete op­po­si­tion to the sci­en­tific com­mu­nity, dared to imag­ine a me­chan­i­cal so­lu­tion: what would be­come known as the ma­rine chronome­ter. Dava So­bel weaves in equal parts his­tory, ge­og­ra­phy, as­tron­omy, and nav­i­ga­tion to tell the story of clock­maker John Har­ri­son’s 40-year ob­ses­sion in Lon­gi­tude.

5. THE FEEL GOOD: It’s a story that of­ten goes un­told: When planes hit the tow­ers on 9/11, an ar­mada of fish­er­men and pri­vate boat own­ers mo­bi­lized and suc­cess­fully evac­u­ated 500,000 peo­ple from lower Man­hat­tan.

Amer­i­canDunkirk by James Ken­dra and Tri­cia Wach­t­en­dorf amasses the most com­pre­hen­sive data set avail­able on the wa­ter­borne evac­u­a­tion, of­fer­ing food for thought on civil­ian dis­as­ter re­sponse.

6. THE FISH­ING BOOK: “Guy de la Valdène’s On­theWater is a lovely med­i­ta­tion on wa­ter and na­ture, fish and man,” says Bill Sis­son, ed­i­tor-in-chief of our sis­ter pub­li­ca­tion An­gler­sJour­nal. Writes de la Valdène: “We fished and hunted and drank and cooked from one end of the coun­try to the other for a quar­ter of a cen­tury, with Key West as a bea­con of our sport­ing year.”

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