Nu­tri­tion

Eat for more en­ergy

Prevention (USA) - - CONTENTS - BY KELSEY KLOSS

The foods you eat have a huge im­pact on your en­ergy lev­els, and tak­ing in the right ones can keep you on your game all day. Healthy, en­er­giz­ing foods also help you re­sist hav­ing un­healthy snacks at 3 p.m. (we see you, chips), which messes with your blood sugar, leav­ing you even droop­ier. Eat­ing at reg­u­lar in­ter­vals lets you be steadily fu­eled, says Joan Salge Blake, R.D.N., a clin­i­cal as­so­ciate pro­fes­sor at Bos­ton Univer­sity, so in­cor­po­rate these pickme-up eats into your day.

BULGUR WHEAT

Choose whole-grain, high-fiber carbs like bulgur wheat. With 8 grams of fiber per serv­ing, it slows di­ges­tion, pro­vid­ing sus­tained en­ergy. “Fiber helps to con­trol blood sugar, which is im­por­tant be­cause we get tired when it dips,” says Rachel Lust­garten, R.D., of Weill Cor­nell Medicine and NewYork-Pres­by­te­rian. Take a pass on high-carb foods that have been stripped of their fiber (ahem, white bread), as they quickly spike blood sugar. TRY THIS: Mix 1 cup pre­pared bulgur wheat with chopped fresh pars­ley, chopped to­mato, and chick­peas plus a driz­zle of olive oil and le­mon juice for a de­li­cious grain salad.

EGGS

They’re packed with pro­tein and a lit­tle fat, both of which are help­ful for all-day oomph. “This com­bi­na­tion slows down nu­tri­ent ab­sorp­tion in the small in­tes­tine, mean­ing you’ll feel full and en­er­gized longer,” says Blake. Re­search also shows that pro­tein and fat help stim­u­late sati­ety hor­mones, help­ing you re­sist the mid­day munchies.

TRY THIS: Scram­ble 2 eggs with ¼ cup canned black beans and 2 Tbsp shred­ded Ched­dar cheese. Tuck the eggs into 2 corn tor­tillas and top with 1 Tbsp each salsa and chopped scal­lions for sim­ple break­fast tacos.

CANTALOUPE

This melon is a good source of potas­sium and is made up of 90% water, two things that help you stay bright-eyed. “Potas­sium is one of the elec­trolytes your body needs and is im­por­tant for proper hy­dra­tion, en­ergy bal­ance, and pre­vent­ing fa­tigue,” says Lust­garten. “And fa­tigue can be a symp­tom of even slight de­hy­dra­tion.”

TRY THIS: Fold ½ cup blue­ber­ries and a pinch of cin­na­mon into 1/3 cup part­skim ri­cotta cheese. Spoon the mix­ture into half of a hol­lowed-out cantaloupe. Top with 1 Tbsp sliced al­monds.

MATCHA TEA

For many of us, a lit­tle caf­feine is some­times—OK, of­ten—nec­es­sary. Matcha tea has more caf­feine than other types of green tea, but it con­tains an amino acid that has a calm­ing ef­fect, so it won’t make you as jit­tery as cof­fee will. “There’s re­search to sup­port mod­er­ate caf­feine as a part of a bal­anced life­style,” says Lust­garten. “It may en­hance phys­i­cal per­for­mance and sup­port men­tal acu­ity.”

TRY THIS: Mix 1 tsp matcha pow­der with ¼ cup hot water, whisk­ing rapidly for 1 to 2 min­utes. Com­bine with hot, frothy milk and stir.

Add a driz­zle of honey or maple syrup to taste if de­sired.

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