HIT THE BRAKES ON ROAD RAGE

Lit­tle bumps in the road—traf­fic, tail­gat­ing, get­ting lost—can make us feel ready to, well, blow a gas­ket. Use these ideas to make your­self rage-re­sis­tant no mat­ter where the road takes you.

Prevention (USA) - - HEALTH -

1 KNOW WHERE YOU’RE GO­ING

Be­fore you leave, print out di­rec­tions from Google Maps.That way you’ll still be able to find your des­ti­na­tion if you hit a dead zone or your phone loses power (or drops into a rest stop toi­let!). Fa­mil­iar­ize your­self with the di­rec­tions in­stead of blindly fol­low­ing the GPS, or con­sider get­ting a map— re­mem­ber those?!

2 CHANGE THE CHAN­NEL

Screamy talk ra­dio pro­grams “can ac­ti­vate your ner­vous sys­tem’s fightor-flight re­sponse, which low­ers your thresh­old for anger,” says San Fran­cisco–based psy­chol­o­gist Robert Ne­merovski, Psy.D. Stick to calmer news sta­tions, min­d­ex­pand­ing pod­casts (like

The Moth, Ra­di­o­lab, and

StuffYou Should Know), and happy-mak­ing mu­sic (make a chill-out playlist).

3 DON’T HONK

It’s a tempt­ing way to vent frus­tra­tion, but ac­cord­ing to the AAA Foun­da­tion forTraf­fic Safety, it may goad other driv­ers into act­ing more ag­gres­sive. “Road rage over­rides the ar­eas of the brain that han­dle im­pulse con­trol and judg­ment,” says Ne­merovski. He sug­gests re­peat­ing a mantra to your­self like For­get it. Drive on.

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