INTERROGATING

THE UN­USUAL SUS­PECTS

Recoil - - Interrogating -

SCHWARTZ TAC­TI­CAL

ST VENGEANCE GEN. II

411:

If the Preda­tor was hunt­ing in your neck of the galaxy, we’d ex­pect it to be car­ry­ing some­thing like this spaceage karam­bit. With a slice of ti­ta­nium sand­wiched by two lay­ers of car­bon fiber, the sec­ond gen­er­a­tion of the ST Vengeance is feath­er­weight, eas­ily con­ceal­able, and er­gonomic. To in­crease edge re­ten­tion, tung­sten car­bide has been added to the ti­ta­nium cut­ting sur­face. The han­dle fea­tures a com­fort­able para­cord wrap.

PROS:

Un­like many ill-fit­ting karam­bits made in the West, this bad boy feels good in for­ward grip with your pinky in the re­ten­tion ring due to its align­ment with the han­dle.

Car­bon fiber is sturdy and doesn’t flake or chip eas­ily like on other brands.

Per­fect bal­ance in for­ward or re­verse grip

CONS:

A karam­bit’s curved blade lim­its its ver­sa­til­ity.

The Hol­s­tex sheath is well made, but doesn’t come with a belt or clip at­tach­ment — just grom­met holes for lash­ing your own.

BROWN­ING

SPEED LOAD CE­RAMIC

411:

Ce­ramic knives be­came trendy a few years ago be­cause they’re light­weight, su­per sharp, smell and cor­ro­sion re­sis­tant, and can stay sharp longer than tra­di­tional steel blades. The down­side? Their strength also makes them brit­tle, so they can crack or shat­ter. For­tu­nately, we didn’t ex­pe­ri­ence this con with the Speed Load Ce­ramic. And as its name im­plies, you can swap out its blade for one of two ad­di­tional blades in a few sec­onds.

PROS:

Comes with in­ter­change­able drop-point, guthook, and ca­per blades, all of which can be re­placed quickly in the field.

Blades hold a mean edge.

Even though it has a pocket clip, this fold­ing knife also comes with a ny­lon belt sheath that houses a poly­mer hard case for the ex­tra blades.

Ideal model for hun­ters, an­glers, and out­doorsy types

CONS:

For a medium-sized folder, it’s kinda chunky — and out­right fat when worn in­side the ny­lon belt shealth.

The liner-lock was gritty and needed some lube to dis­en­gage it com­fort­ably when clos­ing the blade. Ce­ramic blades have the po­ten­tial of chip­ping.

BAS­TION GEAR GEN­TLE­MEN’S CARRY KNIFE

411:

This fold­ing knife is made up al­most en­tirely of car­bon fiber, which seems like such a cool idea … un­til you re­al­ize it’s made up al­most en­tirely of car­bon fiber. This fu­tur­is­tic ma­te­rial is fan­tas­tic for cer­tain fast-mov­ing ap­pli­ca­tions (i.e. race cars), but not for tools that are meant to be durable, such as a knife blade. For­tu­nately, this folder is well made and every­thing else (from the pocket clip to the liner-lock) works great.

PROS:

Aes­thet­i­cally pleas­ing Prac­ti­cally as light as a pa­per­clip

Han­dle is com­fort­able, er­gonomic, and not overly slick like some other car­bon fibers.

CONS:

Dull cut­ting edge pushes more than it slices.

Don’t use this to pry; car­bon-fiber blade can snap with enough lat­eral force

Pocket clip is in the tip-down, right-handed con­fig­u­ra­tion only.

BOKER PLUS

ANTI-MC

411:

This so­phis­ti­cated folder is 100-per­cent non­mag­netic.

Its frame-lock han­dle is made from ti­ta­nium, which is strong, light­weight, and both rust and chem­i­cal re­sis­tant. On the busi­ness end, its ce­ramic blade could eas­ily be mis­taken for steel be­cause of its pol­ished mir­ror fin­ish and im­pec­ca­ble hol­low grind. Plus, the ce­ramic blade means it’ll re­tain its edge for longer than its steel coun­ter­parts. Comes with a deep-carry pocket clip.

PROS:

Cuts like a laser (and prob­a­bly will for a long time)

Its non-re­ac­tive ma­te­ri­als makes it ideal for cut­ting fruit or other foods that could stain steel blades.

This gen­tle­man’s knife is el­e­gant in its smooth lines and sim­ple de­sign.

CONS:

Ce­ramic blades can chip, so be choosey about your cut­ting sur­faces.

Don’t use this to pop open paint cans or jammed doors — the blade might snap. Sorry, but the pocket clip is only for right­ies who like the tip point­ing down.

COLD STEEL

DELTA DART

411:

Cold Steel makes a wide range of deadly edged weapons, from fixed blades and tom­a­hawks to spears and long swords. The com­pany also has a se­ries of self-de­fense tools made of poly­mers, but they’re noth­ing to toy around with. The Delta Dart is one such ex­am­ple. Though it doesn’t have any cut­ting edges, the tri­an­gu­lar cross-sec­tion ends in a sharp point that makes for a pow­er­ful stab­ber. A neck sheath is sold sep­a­rately.

PROS:

Ridicu­lously light yet tough and strong

Im­mense pierc­ing power

De­spite be­ing as slim as a Sharpie, the tex­tured han­dle is ac­tu­ally pretty grippy.

With a re­tail cost of six bucks, it’s easy on the wal­let.

CONS:

The cheap price tag means the sheath isn’t in­cluded. This bad boy has only one use — punc­tur­ing — lim­it­ing its func­tion­al­ity.

VZ GRIPS

DIA­MANTE DAG­GER G10

411:

G10 is one of our fa­vorite han­dle ma­te­ri­als be­cause it isn’t just light and strong, but also re­sis­tant to mois­ture, chem­i­cals, cor­ro­sion, and tem­per­a­ture. This fiber­glass lam­i­nate also doesn’t con­duct elec­tric­ity. So it’s no sur­prise that VZ Grips (famed for mak­ing pis­tol grips and ri­fles rails) has used its own pro­pri­ety G10 to get into the knife game. The Dia­mante Dag­ger ex­em­pli­fies the ben­e­fits of us­ing this ma­te­rial for stab­bing im­ple­ments.

PROS:

Its blade pro­file makes it per­fect for de­liv­er­ing pen­e­trat­ing strikes.

Am­ple fin­ger guards pre­vent slip­page dur­ing use.

In­cred­i­bly strong with good length with­out the usual bulk

Comes with a sturdy sheath

CONS:

G10 just doesn’t take a fine cut­ting edge and, there­fore, can’t slice with au­thor­ity. At least this dag­ger has ser­ra­tions that could be used to saw fi­brous ma­te­rial in a pinch.

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