En­try­way

TAKE CHARGE OF ALL THAT GEAR

Secrets of Getting Organized - - Storage Doctor -

Stop kid- re­lated messes at the door with this stream­lin­ing ap­proach.

1. BOX IT. Have each fam­ily mem­ber drop per­sonal stuff in a card­board box for one week. As­sess the items in the box, ask­ing where and how each item is best stored.

2. HANG YOUR ES­SEN­TIALS.

Des­ig­nate a hook for every jacket and back­pack (or other per­sonal bag), tak­ing care to hang hooks at heights kids can reach. Des­ig­nate one for keys.

3. SET YOUR SHOE

AGENDA. Stop fight­ing it: Shoes are a fact of life. De­cide on the num­ber of shoes each fam­ily mem­ber may keep in the en­try area and en­force your pol­icy with a nightly purge. Add open shelves, cub­bies, or shal­low bins to ac­com­mo­date shoes.

4. LOOK DEEPER.

Just be­cause you use some­thing every day doesn’t mean it au­to­mat­i­cally de­serves a spot in the en­try. Sports equip­ment, for ex­am­ple, needs to air out and is bet­ter stored in a garage or on the porch. Mu­si­cal in­stru­ments should go to the spot where you prac­tice. Wor­ried about for­get­ting im­por­tant items when you leave? Af­fix a note to the door frame or hang a re­lated item (your sheet mu­sic bag, your gym ID) on a hook near the door to trig­ger your mem­ory.

5. FA­CIL­I­TATE COM­MU­NI­CA­TION.

Use wall pock­ets or ver­ti­cal mag­a­zine files to col­lect each per­son’s in­com­ing papers, per­mis­sion slips, and ac­tiv­ity forms.

6. BLOCK THE JUNK.

Move a re­cy­cling bin near the front door so you can gather junk mail and non­cre­ative kid papers the mo­ment they en­ter your home.

7. OB­SERVE AND

AD­JUST. Set­ting up new sys­tems takes time. Pin­point what’s not work­ing. Then cre­ate more land­ing spots as needed.

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