ANT-MAN AND THE WASP

Sound & Vision - - ENTERTAINMENT -

THE MOST FUN thread in the Earth-bound ta­pes­try of the Mar­vel Cin­e­matic Uni­verse owes much to the pres­ence of star/co-writer Paul Rudd, whose comedic charms and dra­matic sen­si­bil­i­ties em­biggen an other­wise diminu­tive hero. Two years af­ter the fall­out from Cap­tain Amer­ica: Civil War, when ex-con Scott Lang (Rudd) il­le­gally fought as Ant-man, he’s near­ing the com­ple­tion of his house ar­rest and ready to get his life back on track. But as the only per­son to ever visit the sub-mi­cro­scopic quan­tum realm and re­turn safely, he is uniquely qual­i­fied to help ge­nius in­ven­tor Hank Pym (Michael Dou­glas) and his tough-as-nails daugh­ter Hope (Evan­ge­line Lilly). Af­ter a se­ries of bizarre vi­sions, Scott is drafted into a risky plan that might of­fer the only chance of res­cu­ing a long-lost mem­ber of the fam­ily.

The 2.39:1 im­age in­cludes fre­quent dark se­quences that are rea­son­ably well-re­solved at 4K, and much of Act III show­cases the freaky vi­sions of the car­toon­ishly hued nano-world, which should show your TV’S avail­able wide color gamut ca­pa­bil­ity to am­ple ad­van­tage. Clever, seam­less spe­cial ef­fects give life to some droll sight gags that play whim­si­cally off of Pym’s shrink­ing/grow­ing tech and de­pict it in in­spired ways. High dy­namic range is used ju­di­ciously through­out to sub­tly en­hance select mo­ments.

Dolby Atmos is a wholly ap­pro­pri­ate sound­track for­mat choice for this movie, what with all of the size-re­duc­tion that puts much of the ac­tion above the lis­tener. The Truehd core pleas­antly sur­prises as well with gen­er­ous place­ment of cues in the sides and rears, be it a bounc­ing bowl­ing ball, a wolf howl­ing in the dis­tance, or off-cam­era voices. Fly­ing ants and the oc­ca­sional winged hero­ine tend to zip all around the 7.1-chan­nel sound­field, adding ex­cite­ment with their tre­bly, phase-y pres­ence. The tremen­dous en­ergy re­quired to bring all of this su­per-science to bear is also keenly rep­re­sented by the re­al­is­tic de­ploy­ment of low-fre­quency ef­fects in many of the movie’s scenes.

There are no ex­tras on the 4K disc, but the com­pan­ion Blu-ray fea­tures an au­dio com­men­tary by direc­tor Pey­ton Reed, four fea­turettes, three gag/out­take reels, plus deleted scenes with op­tional com­men­tary. A Movies Any­where dig­i­tal copy code is sup­plied.

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