TO­DAY IN HIS­TORY

South Florida Sun-Sentinel (Sunday) - - Nation & World - By The Associated Press

the first Amer­i­can so­ci­ety for the abo­li­tion of slav­ery was formed in Philadel­phia.

On April 14, 1775,

Pres­i­dent Abra­ham Lin­coln was shot and mor­tally wounded by John Wilkes Booth dur­ing a per­for­mance of “Our Amer­i­can Cousin” at Ford’s The­ater in Wash­ing­ton.

In 1865,

the British liner RMS Ti­tanic col­lided with an ice­berg in the North At­lantic at 11:40 p.m. ship’s time. (The ship went un­der two hours and 40 min­utes later with the loss of 1,514

In 1912,

lives.)

the John Stein­beck novel “The Grapes of Wrath” was first pub­lished by Vik­ing Press.

In 1939,

Am­pex Corp. demon­strated the first prac­ti­cal video­tape recorder at the Na­tional As­so­ci­a­tion of Ra­dio and Tele­vi­sion Broad­cast­ers Con­ven­tion in Chicago.

In 1956,

the mu­si­cal “Bye Bye Birdie” opened on Broad­way.

In 1960,

the first test flight of Amer­ica’s first op­er­a­tional space shut­tle, the Columbia, ended suc­cess­fully with a land­ing at Ed­wards Air Force Base in Cal­i­for­nia.

In 1981, In 1994,

Turner Clas­sic Movies made its ca­ble de­but; the first film it aired “Gone with the Wind.”

in a his­toric pol­icy shift, Pres­i­dent Ge­orge W. Bush en­dorsed Is­rael’s plan to hold on to part of the West Bank in any fi­nal peace set­tle­ment with the Pales­tini­ans; he also ruled out Pales­tinian refugees re­turn­ing to Is­rael, bring­ing strong crit­i­cism from the Pales­tini­ans.

In 2004,

North Ko­rea said it was restart­ing its rogue nu­clear pro­gram, boot­ing U.N. in­spec­tors and pulling out of dis­ar­ma­ment talks in an an­gry re­ac­tion to the U.N. Se­cu­rity Coun­cil’s con­dem­na­tion of its April 5 rocket launch.

In 2009,

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