MEDGAR EVERS' HOME CLOSER TO BE­ING NA­TIONAL MON­U­MENT

South Florida Times - - WEEK IN REVIEW -

JACK­SON, Miss. (AP)- The Mis­sis­sippi home of a slain civil rights leader is one step closer to be­com­ing a na­tional mon­u­ment.

The U.S. House voted Tues­day to pass a bill that would es­tab­lish the Medgar Evers Na­tional Mon­u­ment in Jack­son. The Sen­ate must still vote on the mea­sure filed by Demo­cratic Rep. Ben­nie Thomp­son of Mis­sis­sippi.

As Mis­sis­sippi's first NAACP field sec­re­tary, be­gin­ning in 1954, Evers or­ga­nized protests and boy­cotts to fight seg­re­ga­tion. He was as­sas­si­nated by a white su­prem­a­cist out­side his fam­ily's Jack­son home in 1963.

If the mod­est ranch-style home be­comes a na­tional mon­u­ment, the fed­eral gov­ern­ment will take it over from Touga­loo Col­lege, bring­ing more money for preser­va­tion. The col­lege sup­ports the change.

The fed­eral An­tiq­ui­ties Act gives the pres­i­dent wide au­thor­ity to des­ig­nate na­tional mon­u­ments to pro­tect fed­eral sites con­sid­ered his­toric or ge­o­graph­i­cally or cul­tur­ally sig­nif­i­cant. Mon­u­ments also can be des­ig­nated by Congress. Pres­i­dent Trump has or­dered re­duc­tions to sev­eral large na­tional mon­u­ments in the West, call­ing them part of a “mas­sive land grab'' by Barack Obama and other pres­i­dents.

The chair­man of the House Nat­u­ral Re­sources Com­mit­tee, Repub­li­can Rep. Rob Bishop of Utah, said on the House floor Tues­day that the proper way to cre­ate mon­u­ments is by leg­isla­tive ac­tion.

Mak­ing the Evers home a na­tional mon­u­ment is widely sup­ported by Repub­li­cans and Democrats.

PHOTO COUR­TESY OF THE COM­PLEX.COM

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.