Stamford Advocate

Hochul vows swift action as she takes helm in N.Y.

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ALBANY, N.Y. — Kathy Hochul became the first female governor of New York on Tuesday and in her first hours on the job sought to bring a new sense of urgency to tackling immense problems that went unaddresse­d during Andrew Cuomo’s distracted final months in office.

In an afternoon address, she said she was making masks mandatory for anyone entering schools and would implement a requiremen­t that all school staff either be vaccinated or undergo weekly COVID-19 testing. She said the state would launch a back-to-school testing program to make testing for students and staff more convenient.

“None of us want a rerun of last year’s horrors with COVID-19,” Hochul said. “Therefore we will take proactive steps to prevent that from happening.”

Hochul also pledged quick action to unstick an applicatio­n bottleneck that has kept federal aid money from flowing to renters who suffered financiall­y because of the pandemic. She promised to get the state ready to distribute vaccine booster shots, when they become widely available, including reopening mass inoculatio­n sites that had previously closed.

Hochul, a Democrat and former member of Congress from western New York, took the oath of office just after midnight in a brief, private event overseen by the state’s chief judge, Janet DiFiore.

Over the next few months, Hochul, who was little known as lieutenant governor, will have an opportunit­y to reshape Albany, where Cuomo dominated decision-making for years before being felled in a sexual harassment scandal.

For generation­s, it’s been said that all of the real decisions in the state government were made by “three men in a room“— the governor and the leaders of the state Senate and Assembly.

Now, for the first time, two of those three — Hochul and Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins — are women. Only the state Assembly is led by a man, Speaker Carl Heastie.

Hochul promised more transparen­cy and ethical conduct in government going forward.

She ordered an overhaul of state government policies on sexual harassment and ethics, including requiring that all training be done live, “instead of allowing people to click their way through a class.”

And she said she would order ethics training for every state government employee, “which, shockingly,” she said, “is not required across the board.”

Cuomo left office at midnight, two weeks after he announced he would resign rather than face an impeachmen­t battle that appeared inevitable after a report by independen­t investigat­ors — overseen by state Attorney General Letitia James — concluded he had sexually harassed 11 women.

Hochul takes over a state still dealing with the coronaviru­s pandemic, and struggling to get aid out the door.

Little of the $2 billion set aside by the federal government to help New Yorkers pay off rent debt has been distribute­d. Thousands face the possibilit­y of eviction after state and federal protection­s expire.

Hochul also pledged quick action to distribute money from a new $2 billion state fund intended to benefit unauthoriz­ed immigrants who didn’t qualify for other types of federal pandemic relief aid.

DiFiore administer­ed the oath in the Capitol in front of a stone fireplace, atop which were placed family pictures.

 ?? Hans Pennink / Associated Press ?? New York Chief Judge Janet DiFiore swears in Kathy Hochul as the first woman to be New York's governor while her husband Bill Hochul holds a bible during a ceremonial swearing-in ceremony at the state Capitol on Tuesday, in Albany, N.Y.
Hans Pennink / Associated Press New York Chief Judge Janet DiFiore swears in Kathy Hochul as the first woman to be New York's governor while her husband Bill Hochul holds a bible during a ceremonial swearing-in ceremony at the state Capitol on Tuesday, in Albany, N.Y.

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