THIS SIL­VER­ADO HAS IT ALL

’BAGS, BIL­LETS & A BODY DROP

Street Trucks - - FRONT PAGE -

THERE’S AN IN­TER­NET MEME THAT’S BEEN GO­ING AROUND CALLED DIS­TRACTED BOYFRIEND. In it an at­trac­tive girl is seen in the fore­ground, obliv­i­ous to the guy star­ing at her while his girl­friend looks at him, ticked off. The idea is that al­though the guy al­ready has some­one great, he’s al­ways look­ing for some­thing (po­ten­tially) bet­ter around the corner.

Fabian Gar­cia of Bak­ers­field, Cal­i­for­nia, had some­thing great. He al­ready had a few builds un­der his belt at just 26 years old, and he had an ’06 Sil­ver­ado sin­gle cab that was about to go un­der the knife. Since he couldn’t drive the

’06 reg­u­larly, he picked up a ’14 Sil­ver­ado to cruise, and if that were all that he did, he wouldn’t have needed to look any fur­ther. But since he’s the type of guy who can’t leave any­thing stock, he painted the ’14 purple and low­ered it on bil­lets, just for fun. Even­tu­ally that turned into a trip to a car show where it gar­nered a ton of at­ten­tion, and the cy­cle of the Dis­tracted Boyfriend was com­plete. Sure, he had a per­fectly good ’06 that he could work on, but that ’14 Silvy was look­ing pretty nice. So, he sold the ’06 and used the prof­its to fund the build of the ’14.

At this point, Fabian had a nice truck. See­ing it get all the looks at the shows made him won­der how much big­ger the spec­ta­cle would be if he ’bagged and body-dropped it. Af­ter all, it was on big wheels and painted; in theory, lay­ing it out should be pretty straight­for­ward. But

it wasn’t.

He sent the truck to

Aldo Mar­tinez at Aldo’s Sus­pen­sion and Sheet Metal in Fresno, Cal­i­for­nia, where ev­ery­thing was blown apart. The frame was re­done from the fire­wall back with all new man­drel-bent steel re­plac­ing the stock ma­te­ri­als. The back end was 3-linked, while up front they in­stalled an Un­par­al­leled Cus­toms front sus­pen­sion kit with uni-balls. This al­lowed the sus­pen­sion to cy­cle al­most in­fin­itely, but there was still more work to be done. The brake booster was in the way, so it was re­placed with a hy­draulic model. The steer­ing rack was an is­sue, so The Chop­pin’ Block came in to build some­thing cus­tom that would work. When they were all done, about 17 months later, the truck laid hard on 26s and looked tough—al­most.

It’s hard to get out of any cus­tom shop with­out a nick or two to the fin­ish, and that was the case with the purple fin­ish on Fabian’s Sil­ver­ado. By then, the 2016 mod­els had come out, and he wished he had one of those be­cause he liked the front clip bet­ter. Af­ter some de­lib­er­a­tion and a few dozen con­ver­sa­tions with a friend of a friend at a Chevro­let deal­er­ship, he de­cided to bite the bul­let and pur­chase a hood, fend­ers,

Z71 grille, bumper and all of the other ac­cou­trements

that he would need to make the swap work. As it turns out, it’s not that big of a deal. Sure, he needed a core sup­port and a ton of lit­tle clips, but oth­er­wise it all came to­gether and bolted up nicely. The whole truck was re­sprayed with the spe­cial purple sheen.

Let’s take a mo­ment to ad­dress the color. Purple isn’t the typ­i­cal choice for your av­er­age street truck, so why did he go with it? Well, that’s the ex­act rea­son why: It isn’t typ­i­cal. Purple is fairly rare, and it’s bright enough to get at­ten­tion. Has the truck set a trend? We’re not sure what this year’s color of the mo­ment is go­ing to be, but this is cer­tainly a con­tender.

With the truck laid out and look­ing good, the time came to fo­cus on the other lit­tle de­tails. The in­te­rior was cleaned up with leather and suede, ac­cented nicely by purple stitch­ing. A mild stereo was added with a pair of JL Au­dio 12s mounted be­hind the seats, and the Ac­cuair e-level con­troller was po­si­tioned right within reach near the con­sole. Even though it may seem like it’s a sim­ple build—if any­one can call build­ing 3/4 of a frame and a full color change sim­ple—it’s cer­tainly im­pact­ful. Trucks like this don’t get built ev­ery day, and this is a shin­ing ex­am­ple of the form.

Now we come to the ob­vi­ous ques­tion: What’s next? Fabian has two paths in front of him. He’s pre­par­ing for a few big shows this year, which means that he might add some graph­ics and swap out the stock dash for one from an Es­calade.

But then there’s a re­cent de­vel­op­ment. Some­one has come around ask­ing about the truck and whether or not he would sell it. That would free him up to build that Ta­hoe on 28s that he’s been dreaming of, which would cer­tainly be a step up. That’s right, even though Fabian has some­thing great al­ready, he knows that there’s al­ways some­thing bet­ter (po­ten­tially) around the corner.

THE IN­TE­RIOR OF THE TRUCK IS CLEANAND SIM­PLE, WITH CUTDOWN CHEVY BUCK­ETSAND PAINTED AC­CES­SORIES.

PUTTING THE 2016 FRONT CLIP ON THE 2014 TRUCK TURNED OUT TO BE A PRETTY GOOD IDEA. EX­PECT TO SEE MORE OF TH­ESE SWAPS IN THE FU­TURE.

THE 26-INCH RACELINE WHEELS LOOK STEL­LAR TUCKED INTO THE 2016 FRONT FEND­ERS.

THE IN­SIDE OF THE BED IS JUST AS CLEAN AS THE OUT­SIDE AND SHOWS OFF THE SUS­PEN­SION PER­FECTLY.

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