MAFLA TRUCK

Street Trucks - - MAFIA TRUCK -

THE MAIN DIF­FER­ENCE BE­TWEEN CLAS­SICS AND LATE-MODEL TRUCKS IS HIS­TORY. Clas­sics were built decades ago for a pur­pose, and now we strive to give them a new one. Usu­ally they’re pur­chased from older peo­ple who have owned them for ages but might have ne­glected them for years. Some­times they’ve been passed down to fam­ily mem­bers be­fore some­one de­cides to give them some love. What­ever the case may be, they all come with a back­story that makes them more spe­cial than other types of ve­hi­cles.

For Sean Provost, his tale of this ’70 Chevy C-10 is es­pe­cially in­ter­est­ing. It all started when

Sean was hired at a lo­cal cof­fee fran­chise, Dutch Bros., based in the North­west. Sean soon be­came a man­ager and later took on own­er­ship of five fran­chises. In the course of his ca­reer he’s had

THE BODY RE­CEIVED A FEW MOD­I­FI­CA­TIONS THAT DON’T CHANGE THE LOOK OF THE ORIG­I­NAL TRUCK BUT EN­HANCE WHAT IS AL­READY THERE.”

steady com­mu­ni­ca­tion with Dutch Bros. co­founder Travis Bo­ersma.

But this story is about a truck, right? Well, Travis would drive his C-10 to busi­ness meet­ings with Sean, and it caught Sean’s eye. He de­cided that he had to have it, and af­ter 10 years of con­vinc­ing, Travis sold the truck to Sean.

Al­though Sean has a strong work ethic, he also knows how to play hard, and he wanted to up­grade the truck to suit his life­style. He’s also started his own shop, Provost Mo­tor­sports, where he does full builds. It’s the base for his off-road rac­ing team as well. At the time he pur­chased the C-10, his shop was in its in­fancy, and he de­cided to put his faith in a few other hands to get the build mov­ing.

His first stop was Peck­ham Pre­ci­sion En­gines, where a num­bers-match­ing big-block was re­built and mated to a 700R4 trans­mis­sion made to take a beat­ing.

Next, Sean trusted Law­son Speed Shop to lower the truck and up­date the han­dling so it would be au­tocross ready. He knew mod­ern fea­tures like power steer­ing and coil-overs would cre­ate sporty driv­abil­ity. Up front, the frame was up­graded with a Scott’s Hotrods ‘N’ Cus­toms’ bolt-on IFS.

In the rear, the Strange En­gi­neer­ing 9-inch rearend is held in place with a Porter­built bolt-on sus­pen­sion with tubu­lar trail­ing arms. The frame was boxed to make it rigid, while QA1 coil-overs pro­vide a smooth yet stable ride. Brak­ing has also been im­proved with a set of 13-inch front and 12-inch rear Wil­wood disc brakes with a

Scott’s un­der-dash brake mas­ter/ booster as­sem­bly.

With the truck de­cently set up, Sean wanted to give it a fresh paint job, which is where things got in­ter­est­ing. He took the truck to Com­pani Color. Owner Joe Com­pani didn’t want to lay down a show qual­ity paint job with­out know­ing what was un­der­neath, so Sean took the truck next door to

South City Rod & Cus­tom where it was dis­as­sem­bled, and the body pan­els

were me­dia blasted. Once it was down to bare me­tal, South City’s Bill Ganahl re­paired some weath­ered sheet me­tal, and while do­ing so, came up with some ideas that would take the truck to the next level. Af­ter con­sult­ing Sean, the team was given the green light to move for­ward with their plans.

The body re­ceived a few mod­i­fi­ca­tions that don’t change the look of the orig­i­nal truck but en­hance what is al­ready there. Start­ing up front, a shaved re­pop bumper was nar­rowed, and the mount­ing brack­ets were trimmed to tuck it closer to the body. Then the hood peak was con­tin­ued to the cowl, which was also shaved and molded to the cab. Un­der­neath the cowl, a fire­wall was cre­ated from scratch, and

THESE OLDER TRUCKS TELL A TALE, AND THIS ONE CER­TAINLY HAS A GOOD ONE TO GO ALONG WITH ITS RE­CENTLY RE­FINED LOOK.”

the rest of the en­gine compartmen­t was re­designed to match. The rain gut­ters were al­ready shaved, but the doors were re­worked to ac­cept sin­gle side glass.

To com­ple­ment the new look of the en­gine bay, Bill de­cided it was only fit­ting to make the bed match. The wheel tubs were widened, and the in­ner sides were cus­tom made. The tail­gate was shaved on the out­side, and the in­side was made to match the rest of the in­nards of the bed. The steel roll pan was mas­saged a bit, and the li­cense plate box was fit­ted. Then it was ready for Joe to do some body­work and lay down the House of Kolor True Blue Pearl. After­wards, Tri Val­ley in­stalled new glass.

Since the build was snow­balling, Sean de­cided to go ahead and up­grade the in­te­rior too. Like the rest of the truck, the in­te­rior work was done strictly as an up­grade, not to make the truck look sig­nif­i­cantly dif­fer­ent. DJ De­signs stepped in and re­shaped the bench seat. Then a laser scan­ner and 3D printer were used to cre­ate new door pan­els and kick pan­els. The dash pad was ex­tended as well. All of these pieces were cov­ered in Rel­i­cate leather laser-etched with the de­sign from the CST pack­age for these trucks. A square-weave car­pet and ididit steer­ing col­umn with Nardi wheel com­plete the in­te­rior.

Fin­ish­ing the truck, a set of Amer­i­can Rac­ing VN407 Shelby Co­bra SL wheels with Red­line tires was bolted on. Though the wheels do change the look of the truck, the re­main­ing work is very mild. To the untrained eye, most would think the truck had just been low­ered and painted with a mod­ern set of billets in­stalled. But when you look closer, you can see that many pieces were redone to en­hance what was al­ready there. The goal was to up­grade the truck to to­day’s stan­dards with flow­ing lines and per­fectly spaced body gaps.

As far as the orig­i­nal ties to

Sean’s line of busi­ness, there are bumper stick­ers and shirts made for ex­ec­u­tives only in the cof­fee chain that read, “Dutch Bros. Mafia.” Sean took this sen­ti­ment to heart and con­sid­ers the truck part of his work fam­ily since it once wore one of these stick­ers. These older trucks tell a tale, and this one cer­tainly has a good one to go along with its re­cently re­fined look.

THE EN­GINE COMPARTMEN­T IS A REAL SPEC­TA­CLE SINCE A NEW FIRE­WALL, IN­NER WHEEL COV­ERS AND RA­DI­A­TOR SHROUD WERE CUS­TOM-MADE FOR A DIS­TINC­TIVE LOOK.

THE DASH PAD WAS CUS­TOM­IZED TO COVER THE EN­TIRE TOP OF THE DASH.

ABOVE. THOUGH THIS IS NOT THE EN­GINE THAT IT WAS BORN WITH, SEAN SET OUT TO FIND A NUM­BERS-MATCH­ING 396-CI RE­PLACE­MENT TO KEEP THE TRUCK IN ITS ORIG­I­NAL FORM. RIGHT. SINCE THE EN­GINE COMPARTMEN­T WAS FIRST TRANS­FORMED WITH SHEET ME­TAL WORK, BILL OF...

ABOVE. DJ DE­SIGNS UP­GRADED THE IN­TE­RIOR WITH­OUT CHANG­ING THINGS TOO DRAS­TI­CALLY. THE NARDI STEER­ING WHEEL WITH CUS­TOM-EN­GRAVED HORN BUT­TON TIES THE TRUCK BACK TO SEAN’S LINE OF WORK.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.