ONLY GOOD VIBES

Street Trucks - - THE BOTTOM LINE - BY KEVIN AGUILAR

ICAN’T STAND DIS­CRIM­I­NA­TION. Peo­ple hate on oth­ers for so many things, and I can’t help but feel em­pa­thy for those who get the short end of the stick in these sit­u­a­tions. This doesn’t just hap­pen in the gen­eral pop­u­la­tion, it also hap­pens within our com­mu­nity.

I’m not one for be­ing po­lit­i­cally cor­rect all of the time; I’m a firm be­liever that peo­ple can still be a bit edgy. What’s life with­out a lit­tle spice? Not ev­ery­one will get along, that’s just how the world works. How­ever, some peo­ple take things too far and are judg­men­tal about at­tributes that don’t mat­ter, usu­ally thanks to a big ego. I’ve al­ways felt that you shouldn’t take your­self too se­ri­ously. It’s healthy to be able to laugh at your­self once in a while.

What I’m get­ting at is that some peo­ple un­fairly look down on other peo­ple’s builds. Not ev­ery­one has an un­lim­ited bud­get or decades of ex­pe­ri­ence build­ing ve­hi­cles. When I look at a truck, I think about its back­story. I put my­self in the owner’s mind­set and con­sider how proud they must be.

Al­though we usu­ally fea­ture high-end builds in Street Trucks, we do it to in­spire. The trucks on the cover might be unattain­able for most, but that’s OK be­cause it gives you an op­por­tu­nity to ap­pre­ci­ate in­no­va­tive and unique styles. If you pay at­ten­tion to these de­tails, you can ap­ply them in sub­tle ways that suit your bud­get and skill level.

I ap­pre­ci­ate a daily-driven truck that doesn’t have the en­tire cus­tom palette thrown at it yet show­cases well-ex­e­cuted changes. Hell, this is why I brought back the read­ers’ rides sec­tion, which we re­cently re­named “Home­town He­roes.” Not ev­ery­one can build a cover truck, but I like to share the ev­ery­day trucks that are also badass.

At Street Trucks we like to share our sto­ries and of­fer lessons be­cause we know not ev­ery­one is on the same level. Some peo­ple get their egos worked up and for­get that they likely came from hum­ble be­gin­nings.

Street Trucks is the very first mag­a­zine I turned to when I was in high school and wanted to cus­tom­ize my bone-stock Chevy S-10. I didn’t know any bet­ter, but the writ­ers did such a good job of doc­u­ment­ing their tri­als and tribu­la­tions that I felt like I was part of the team. We all have to start some­where, and

I’m for­tu­nate that this mag­a­zine in­spired me to con­tinue work­ing on my truck.

When I write sto­ries or put an is­sue to­gether, I al­ways think back to teenaged me and note how I would have ben­e­fit­ted from the step-by-step tech info in­cluded. I think the key to keep­ing this scene alive is in­spir­ing new­bies in­stead of mak­ing fun of them. When I was first find­ing my way, mak­ing friends in the scene and talk­ing about how to do var­i­ous mods helped me the most.

I re­mem­ber a time when 20inch wheels were con­sid­ered big, yet a few builders took things fur­ther and ran even larger wheels. Naysay­ers in­sisted the gi­ant wheels were goofy, but the cus­tomiz­ers who stuck their necks out were pi­o­neers who paved the way for the rest of us.

If there’s any­thing to take away from this, it’s that you shouldn’t be too quick to judge some­one else. Some­times you need to step out­side of the box in or­der to make waves in the scene. Let’s not pick on some­one be­cause they have a dif­fer­ent style. Ev­ery­one has their strug­gles, and if they need a pick-me-up, don’t be afraid to lend a hand or tell them that you can ap­pre­ci­ate the work it took to get as far as they have. Be a buddy not a bully. I think we could all ben­e­fit from this view­point, so that in the long run, our scene will grow and thrive.

SOME­TIMES YOU NEED TO STEP OUT­SIDE OF THE BOX IN OR­DER TO MAKE WAVES IN THE SCENE. LET’S NOT PICK ON SOME­ONE BE­CAUSE THEY HAVE A DIF­FER­ENT STYLE. EV­ERY­ONE HAS THEIR STRUG­GLES, AND IF THEY NEED A PICKME-UP, DON’T BE AFRAID TO LEND A HAND …”

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