Sun Sentinel Broward Edition

Groups pushing to vaccinate migrant farmworker­s in Florida

- By Adriana Gomez Licon

MIAMI — It’s a race against time for nonprofits, organizati­ons and officials who are trying to vaccinate thousands of farmworker­s who were denied priority access in Florida but now have to travel north to harvest crops in other regions.

Farmworker advocates are asking officials to quickly mobilize to areas such as Homestead, south of Miami, and Immokalee, east of Naples, and to be more lenient when requiring proof of residency now that the state has lowered the vaccine eligibilit­y age. They say many farmworker­s are in the country illegally and don’t have a driver’s license or other documents required as an alternativ­e.

Top officials with MiamiDade County told activists and farmworker­s this week at a virtual roundtable on vaccine distributi­on not to worry about the documents and focus instead on outreach and gathering groups of farmworker­s ready to get the shot.

“I think we can handle the IDs. We just need to get the numbers and get the places. I need to know where you want us, how many. That’s what I am looking for,” said Frank Rollason, director of emergency management for Miami-Dade County.

Groups such as the Coalition of Immokalee Workers have decried that Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis did not prioritize farmworker­s in the state’s vaccine rollout like other governors did.

Florida Agricultur­e Commission­er Nikki Fried says she has been asking the governor since December to allow farmworker­s to get the shot.

The vaccinatio­n plan restricted community clinics from starting inoculatio­ns because many of these population­s were not yet eligible by age. Since January, the state began requiring proof of Florida residency, adding another hurdle for some workers.

DeSantis’ vaccine motto has been “seniors first,” with a few exceptions such as people with underlying health conditions, older police officers, firefighte­rs and teachers.

“Until recently, it was still over 65, and then it was over 50. And most farmworker­s are younger than that,” said Dr. Emily Ptaszek, head of the Healthcare Network, a clinic that serves migrant farmworker­s in Immokalee.

Florida lowered the age to 40 this week and will open it up to everyone Monday.

Lupe Gonzalo, an organizer at the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, says farmworker­s are exposed to the virus because they often live in crowded conditions and travel together in vans or buses. Gonzalo says many of them suffer from medical conditions that puts them at a high risk for severe COVID-19.

“Even when they deem us as essential farmworker­s, they treat us as if we are disposable,” Gonzalo said.

Florida has about 100,000 farmworker­s, and Dr. Ptaszek, from the Immokalee clinic, says about one-fifth of those are in Immokalee and soon many will be going to Georgia, Tennessee and New Jersey.

She is planning a clinic next week to vaccinate 500 to 600 people.

 ?? CODY JACKSON/AP ?? Workers load a truck with tomatoes March 24 at a farm in Delray Beach. In some states, farmworker­s are not in the priority groups authorized to receive vaccines.
CODY JACKSON/AP Workers load a truck with tomatoes March 24 at a farm in Delray Beach. In some states, farmworker­s are not in the priority groups authorized to receive vaccines.

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