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The Commercial Appeal - Go Memphis - - Movies -

OPEN­ING FRI­DAY

Flight (R, 139 min.) Heroic air­line pi­lot Den­zel Wash­ing­ton is caught in a trou­bling in­ves­ti­ga­tion. Di­rected by Robert Ze­meckis. CinePlanet 16, Col­lierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema. The Man with the Iron Fists (R, 96 min.) The RZA di­rects an old-school fists-of­fury mar­tial-arts ac­tion epic. Col­lierville Towne 16, Cordova Cinema, DeSoto Cinema 16, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema, Ma­jes­tic, Par­adiso, Stage Cinema. Sam­sara (PG-13, 102 min.) In the tradition of the 1982 cult clas­sic “Koy­aanisqatsi,” this vis­ually stun­ning doc­u­men­tary, shot over five years in 25 coun­tries, presents a mon­tage of life of Earth. Ridge­way Four. Wreck-It Ralph (PG) In the lat­est dig­i­tally an­i­mated Dis­ney won­der, a lov­able ar­cade game avatar (voiced by John C. Reilly) tries to es­cape his vil­lain­ous pro­gram­ming. Imag­ine “Toy Story” trans­planted inside a video game. CinePlanet 16 (in 3-D), Col­lierville Towne 16 (in 3-D), Cordova Cinema (in 3-D), DeSoto Cinema 16 (in 3-D), For­est Hill 8, Hol­ly­wood 20 Cinema (in 3-D), Ma­jes­tic, Palace Cinema (in 3-D), Par­adiso (in 3-D), Stage Cinema (in 3-D), Sum­mer Quar­tet Drive-In.

SPE­CIAL MOVIES

Born To Be Wild: The lat­est IMAX film is “an in­spir­ing story of love, ded­i­ca­tion and the re­mark­able bond be­tween hu­mans and an­i­mals” that fo­cuses on ef­forts to rein­tro­duce res­cued ele­phants and orang­utans into the wild. Nar­rated by Mor­gan Free­man. Runs through Nov. 16. IMAX Theater at Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral. Call 901-636-2362 for show times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions. Globe On Screen: Doc­tor Faus­tus (Not rated, 147 min.) A new pro­duc­tion of Christo­pher Mar­lowe’s clas­sic 1604 play about a scholar who sells his soul to the devil. 7 p.m. Thurs­day, Par­adiso. Tick­ets: $12.50. Visit malco.com. Indie Mem­phis Film Fes­ti­val: The 15th an­nual event con­tin­ues through Sun­day. See sto­ries on Pages 4 and 12. Visit in­diemem­phis.com. Lost Bo­hemia (Not rated, 77 min.) A doc­u­men­tary about the bat­tle to save the stu­dio apart­ments above Carnegie Hall, once home and work­place for Isadora Dun­can, Mar­lon Brando, Mar­i­lyn Mon­roe, Nor­man Mailer and oth­ers — in­clud­ing some less-cel­e­brated artists who sud­denly face evic­tion af­ter hav­ing lived there for decades. 7 p.m. Thurs­day, Mem­phis Brooks Mu­seum of Art. Tick­ets: $8, or $6 for mu­seum mem­bers. Visit brooksmu­seum.org. The Metropoli­tan Opera: L’Elisir d’Amore (Not rated, 185 min.) An en­core pre­sen­ta­tion of a re­cent per­for­mance of Donizetti’s comic mas­ter­piece, filmed live on­stage in New York. 6:30 p.m. Wed­nes­day, Par­adiso. Tick­ets: $20. Visit malco.com. To the Arc­tic Nar­rated by Meryl Streep, this jour­ney to the top of the world fol­lows a polar bear fam­ily as it adapts to its chang­ing en­vi­ron­ment. Runs through March 8, 2013. Tick­ets $8.25; $7.50 se­nior cit­i­zens, and $6.50 for ages 3-12. IMAX Theater at Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral. Call 901-636-2362 for show times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions. Tor­nado Alley: Nar­rated by Bill Pax­ton, this IMAX film fol­lows storm-chas­ing sci­en­tists as they track rag­ing tor­na­does. Through Nov. 16. Tick­ets: $8.25 ($7.50 for se­nior cit­i­zens), $6.50 for chil­dren ages 3-12; combo/ group tick­ets avail­able. IMAX Theater at Mem­phis Pink Palace Mu­seum, 3050 Cen­tral. Call 901-636-2362 for show times, tick­ets and reser­va­tions. Alex Cross (PG-13, 102 min.)

½ Tyler Perry trades Madea drag for the shoul­der hol­ster and scowl of a ge­nius po­lice psy­chol­o­gist-de­tec­tive, but this movie couldn’t be any sil­lier if the ti­tle sleuth pur­sued the story’s sadis­tic pro­fes­sional killer in a gray wig and granny panties. A merger of late-pe­riod Charles Bron­son brutish­ness with Perry’s sig­na­ture Life­timelevel bathos, the lat­est James Pat­ter­son adaptation — Mor­gan Free­man played Cross in two ear­lier, oth­er­wise un­re­lated films — is pure pulp non­sense, with about as much rel­e­vance to po­lice pro­ce­dure as “Madea’s Wit­ness Pro­tec­tion.” Sinewy and shaven-headed, Matthew Fox over­acts out­ra­geously and adds a soup­con of camp en­ter­tain­ment value as “the Butcher of Sligo,” a “stim­u­lus-seek­ing so­cio­pathic nar­cis­sist” who leaves chopped-off lit­eral la­dyfin­gers in a glass bowl at a vic­tim’s bed­side; Ed­ward Burns and Rachel Nichols are Cross’ at­trac­tive part­ners, who seem to have wan­dered off the set of a bad prime­time cop show. Cross also has a pic­ture-per­fect fam­ily, which gives him an ex­cuse to vow, re the Butcher: “I will meet his soul at the gates of hell be­fore I let him take a per­son that I love.” The crooks also talk funny: “You the head­shrinker, but you ain’t shrinkin’ nothin’ of mine,” boasts one mis­cre­ant, even as movie­go­ers’ sense their own brains shriv­el­ing. Di­rected by the usu­ally

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